Suicide bombers strike Abdullah Shah Ghazi shrine

Suicide bombers strike Abdullah Shah Ghazi shrine

 

Atleast ten people killed and fifteen injured in two suicide attacks near Abdullah Shah Ghazi, reports. – File Photo

Two explosions rock southern Afghan, killing eight

 

 

 

KARACHI: Two suicide bombers struck Abdullah Shah Ghazi shrine in the southern Pakistani city of Karachi.

Atleast ten people have been killed while fifteen injured. Emergency has been declared in all hospitals, Police said.

Many people are also believed to have been wounded.

Police official Jam Tariq said the blasts occurred Thursday evening at the Abdullah Shah Ghazi shrine near the coast of the Arabian Sea.

Several attacks have targeted Pakistan’s mosques and shrines in recent years, many of them blamed on militant groups. – AP/DawnNews

Pakistan rubbishes report on death of British militant

Pakistan rubbishes report on death of British militant

The United States has massively ramped up its drone campaign in Pakistan’s lawless northwest tribal region on the Afghan border. – (File Photo)

MIRAMSHAH: Pakistani security officials Thursday rejected a report claiming that a British-origin Pakistani militant tasked with attacks in Europe died in a US drone strike last month.

British media reports identifying the militant as Abdul Jabbar said he was being groomed to head a new al Qaeda splinter group in Britain that planned to launch terror attacks on Europe.

“I have no knowledge of any such militant. No one with this name existed and I will say no one of British origin died in recent drone attack,” a senior security official at Islamabad told AFP.

Intelligence officials in Miramshah also dismissed the report as baseless.

“This report is just speculation,” one intelligence official told AFP.

Another intelligence official clarified that an Egyptian national, Abdul Latif, was reportedly killed in a drone attack last month but said no one of British origin was killed.

“We have no report of anyone with the name of Abdul Jabber,” he said.

The officials spoke on condition of anonymity as they were not authorised to talk to media.

The United States has massively ramped up its drone campaign in Pakistan’s lawless northwest tribal region on the Afghan border, amid intelligence claims of a Mumbai-style terror plot to launch commando attacks on European cities.

The plot was reportedly caught in its early planning stages, according to media reports.

According to Pakistani officials the US has launched a record 26 drone attacks since September 3 that have killed nearly 150 people. – AFP

Afghanistan, US in contact with Haqqani insurgents

Afghanistan, US in contact with Haqqani insurgents

Jalaluddin Haqqani. –Photo by AP

LONDON: The Afghan and US governments have recently made contact with insurgent group the Haqqani network, one of the most feared foes of Nato forces in Afghanistan, a British paper reported Thursday.

The government of Afghan President Hamid Karzai took part in direct talks with senior members of the Haqqani group over the summer, said the Guardian daily, citing Pakistani and Arab sources.

The United States, through a Western intermediary, has made indirect contacts over the past year, said the paper.

Talks between the Haqqanis and both countries were extremely tentative, it added.

The Haqqani network’s leadership is based in North Waziristan, in Pakistan’s tribal northwest, an area which has been targeted by a wave of US drone strikes in recent weeks.

The group is loyal to the Taliban and has been blamed for some of the most deadly strikes in Afghanistan. It has close ties with foreign militant groups including Al-Qaeda.

Asked whether talks involving Haqqani, Karzai and the US were taking place, a senior Pakistani official cited in the paper said “you wouldn’t be wrong” but refused to comment further.

Western, Arab and Pakistani official sources cited in the paper said the Haqqanis believe a negotiated settlement is the most likely outcome of the Afghan conflict and do not want to be left out of any deal.

Sirajuddin Haqqani, who has taken over military leadership of the Haqqani group from his father Jalaluddin, “realises he could be a nobody if he doesn’t enter the process,” said a diplomat involved in the discussions. —AFP

Terrorist groups splintering

[The key to understanding all the terrorist groups of Pakistan is the idea that all terrorist organizations blossomed from one source, the Sipah e-Sahaba organization, or the few Shia terrorists who sprung-up to defend their communities from the Sunni killers.  Everytime investigators began to look into the splinter groups they split once again, renaming themselves to throw off investigators.  Sipah was created by Zia.]

Terrorist groups splintering

Zia Khan

The strategy is seen as a way to ‘confuse’ those operating against them.

ISLAMABADSectarian groups Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (LeJ) and Jundallah are in the process of splitting into small cells in Karachi and Quetta and might launch lethal attacks against “important personalities and places” in the near future, an intelligence report said.

Jundallah, an anti-Shia outfit with origins in Iran’s Sistan and Pakistan’s Balochistan province, has divided itself into at least three groups to operate independently in southern cities.

Several activists from the LeJ, a group alleged to have close links with al Qaeda, are also in nexus with Jundallah to make their alliance more “terrible”, said the report obtained by The Express Tribune.

Though the one-page communication between an intelligence agency and provincial law enforcement departments doesn’t give reasons for this move by sectarian jihadi outfits, experts see it as a part of a new strategy to ‘confuse’ those operating against them.

One of three groups, an intelligence official said, was behind the attack on the al Quds rally organised by the Imamia Students Organisation in Quetta on September 2 this year that killed more than 50 people.

The groups are led by Sheikh Abdul Baqi, Azizullah Irani and Qari Zaheer Abbas, the report added.

“All these are active in carrying out sabotage activities in Quetta,” the report said.

Azizullah Irani of the Jundallah group, who is active in Quetta and Karachi and is alleged to be receiving foreign funding, was reportedly involved in the al Quds rally attack.

The next target of the group can be leaders of Shia and Ismailia communities in Karachi, the report warned, adding that they also plan to kidnap wealthy businessmen for ransom.

Abbas used to be an active member of Dawood Badani’s networks and after Badanis’ arrest he joined Saifullah Usmani, who is also a wanted terrorist, the report disclosed without giving details of these characters. “Now Qari Zaheer Abbas is second-in-command of Saifullah Usmani and is heading one of his five terrorist groups,” the report added. All these tiny cells are active in and around Karachi and might move to Quetta in case they don’t feel secure in the port city.

The intelligence outfits have urged the government to be on high alert to avert possible attacks by these groups.

“It is imperative that necessary arrangements and preemptive fool-proof security measures be adopted for the protection of intended targets and personalities,” it said.

“The present situation warrants close coordination among intelligence agencies for sharing information and helping nab the terrorist before they succeed in their nefarious designs and plans,” the report said.

Published in The Express Tribune, October 7th, 2010.

The strategy is seen as a way to ‘confuse’ those operating against them.

ISLAMABADSectarian groups Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (LeJ) and Jundallah are in the process of splitting into small cells in Karachi and Quetta and might launch lethal attacks against “important personalities and places” in the near future, an intelligence report said.

Jundallah, an anti-Shia outfit with origins in Iran’s Sistan and Pakistan’s Balochistan province, has divided itself into at least three groups to operate independently in southern cities.

Several activists from the LeJ, a group alleged to have close links with al Qaeda, are also in nexus with Jundallah to make their alliance more “terrible”, said the report obtained by The Express Tribune.

Though the one-page communication between an intelligence agency and provincial law enforcement departments doesn’t give reasons for this move by sectarian jihadi outfits, experts see it as a part of a new strategy to ‘confuse’ those operating against them.

One of three groups, an intelligence official said, was behind the attack on the al Quds rally organised by the Imamia Students Organisation in Quetta on September 2 this year that killed more than 50 people.

The groups are led by Sheikh Abdul Baqi, Azizullah Irani and Qari Zaheer Abbas, the report added.

“All these are active in carrying out sabotage activities in Quetta,” the report said.

Azizullah Irani of the Jundallah group, who is active in Quetta and Karachi and is alleged to be receiving foreign funding, was reportedly involved in the al Quds rally attack.

The next target of the group can be leaders of Shia and Ismailia communities in Karachi, the report warned, adding that they also plan to kidnap wealthy businessmen for ransom.

Abbas used to be an active member of Dawood Badani’s networks and after Badanis’ arrest he joined Saifullah Usmani, who is also a wanted terrorist, the report disclosed without giving details of these characters. “Now Qari Zaheer Abbas is second-in-command of Saifullah Usmani and is heading one of his five terrorist groups,” the report added. All these tiny cells are active in and around Karachi and might move to Quetta in case they don’t feel secure in the port city.

The intelligence outfits have urged the government to be on high alert to avert possible attacks by these groups.

“It is imperative that necessary arrangements and preemptive fool-proof security measures be adopted for the protection of intended targets and personalities,” it said.

“The present situation warrants close coordination among intelligence agencies for sharing information and helping nab the terrorist before they succeed in their nefarious designs and plans,” the report said.

Published in The Express Tribune, October 7th, 2010.

‘Nato policy responsible for attacks’

‘Nato policy responsible for attacks’

QUETTA  (October 07, 2010) : Home Secretary Balochistan Cap Akbar Hussain Durrani (Retd) said that the US and Nato military officials policy of not informing the Pakistani authorities about position of their tankers had resulted in attack on Nato oil tankers parked in Quetta early Wednesday in which over fifteen tankers were set ablaze.

Talking to APP, he said that Home Department Balochistan was not informed by the US and Nato military officials that oil tankers carrying fuel for the US and allied troops in Afghanistan would be parked at a private terminal located in the outskirts of the Quetta city at night between Tuesday and Wednesday.

He said that Balochistan government with co-operation of security agencies could provide security and protection to the oil tankers if the US and Nato officials had made a request and informed them in this regard. But they did not bother to inform the Balochistan Home Department, he added. To a question, he said that, the Provincial government had provided security to the Nato supplies while being transported to Afghanistan from Karachi through Balochistan routs.

It was regrettable that the US and Nato officials used to violate the instructions of the provincial government in this connection, he said. We have strictly advised to the US led allied forces officials that their supplies should not be moved or parked individually and with out informing the home department of Balochistan; said Durrani. When he was asked whether the Balochistan government had been directed by the Federal government to shut down Chaman border for crossing over the Nato supplies, he denied and said, “No we have not received such directives so far”.

Pakistan says ‘no justification’ for US drone strikes

Pakistan says ‘no justification’ for US drone strikes

MOHIDEEN MIFTHAH

ISLAMABAD, Oct 7, 2010 (AFP) – Pakistan said Thursday there was “no justification nor understanding” for US drone strikes on its soil that have ramped up to record levels in the past month.
“We believe that they are counter-productive and also a violation of our sovereignty,” foreign ministry spokesman Abdul Basit told reporters, adding:
“We hope that the US will revisit its policy.”Basit said that the drone war was “not serving the larger strategic interests, especially in the context of our efforts to win hearts and minds, which is part and parcel of our strategy against militants and terrorists.”Eight people were killed Wednesday in the latest attacks by the pilotless planes against militants in North Waziristan tribal district, security officials said.
The US has launched a record number of strikes since September 3 — a total of 26 drone attacks that have killed 149 people, according to officials.
Since August 2008, 142 strikes have been launched, killing more than 1,100 people.
Officials in Washington say in the past drone strikes have killed a number of high-value targets including former Pakistani Taliban chief Baitullah Mehsud and it has branded the remote border region the global headquarters of Al-Qaeda and the most dangerous place on Earth.
However, the attacks fuel anti-American sentiment in the conservative Muslim country.
Pakistan’s ambassador in Washington, Hussein Haqqani, told the BBC that the increase in strikes in North Waziristan came after intelligence agencies uncovered the plot to “attack multiple targets in Europe”.
He also said that a drone strike on Monday in the district which killed eight militants, including five Germans, was linked to the plot.
The United States does not as a rule confirm drone attacks, but its military and the Central Intelligence Agency operating in Afghanistan are the only forces that deploy the pilotless aircraft in the region.

34 Tajik troops killed in ‘anti-Islamist operations’

28 troops died Wednesday when a helicopter crashed in a possible militant strike

34 Tajik troops killed in ‘anti-Islamist operations’

(AFP) – 5 hours ago

DUSHANBE — Thirty-four Tajik troops have been killed in two separate incidents during a military operation against Islamic insurgents in the east of the Central Asian state, military sources said Thursday.

Twenty-eight troops were killed Wednesday when a military helicopter crashed in a possible militant strike, the sources told AFP, although public statements insisted only four were killed in an accident.

“Not a single passenger survived the crash of the Mi-8 military helicopter on Wednesday morning,” said a military source, speaking on condition of anonymity, raising an earlier toll of 25.

A high-ranking Tajik military source, speaking on condition of strict anonymity, said that it was possible that the helicopter had been shot down by a missile fired by Islamists from their mountain hideouts.

Another six troops were killed in a separate incident caused by the accidental explosion of a mine late Wednesday, according to a military source.

“The faulty placement of a mine led to an explosion that killed six Tajik national guards,” the source told AFP, adding that more than 10 officers were wounded in the incident.