Are Pakistanis Born “Murderers”?–News Report About 9-Month Old Attempted Murderer

[Pakistan’s “Shariah”-based laws are barbaric as well as imbecilic….In Pakistan, Christians can be put to death for failing to acknowledge “superiority” of Islam and babies can be charged with “attempted murder.”]
Muhammad Mosa Khan  was  arrested along with other — older — members of his family.

Is this a genuine baby-faced killer?

Pakistan charges 9 month old with conspiring to murder (VIDEO)

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Muhammad Mosa Khan allegedly threw stones at cops during a raid in Lahore. He was arrested and fingerprinted.

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

 

A nine-month old boy has appeared in court in Pakistan — charged with conspiring to murder.

Muhammad Mosa Khan is alleged to have thrown stones at officers during a police raid, according to The Nation website.

He was subsequently arrested along with other — older — members of his family.

Muhammad Mosa Khan  has even been fingerprinted. WorldNews.tv via YouTube Muhammad Mosa Khan has even been fingerprinted.

The tot has even been fingerprinted and appeared in court drinking milk as he sat on the lap of his grandfather.

He has been charged along with other family members who claim they were protesting against lack of electricity in Lahore, Pakistan’s second largest city.

The child’s appearance in court has prompted the intervention of politicians who are demanding an inquiry. A police officer has been suspended.

But baby Muhammad is not off the hook yet. The case has not been kicked out of court and only adjourned until later this month.

Pakistan Feels Safe To Whitewash Its Mad Dog Terrorist Babies

[This is Pakistan playing its part in the Great Saudi Plan—to rehabilitate the images of some of its terrorist babies, otherwise known as “al-Qaeda,” “Jundullah” and “TTP.”  This corresponds with the Syrian component of the Great Plan, the alleged Saudi “disengagement” from the so-called “Islamists.”  In order for the Saudis to deploy their alleged “Army of Mohammed” (or whatever the latest bullshit title that they have been given), they need ALL of their little “Frankenstein” monsters to enlist in the great cause.  The Saudis are calling-in all of their Islamist “I.O.U.s.”

This latest Pak Army psyop, to sanitize the Pakistani Taliban, and now Jundullah and the ever popular “al-Qaeda,” allegedly under the cover of a “cease fire” with all of these veteran Army/terrorist groups, is explicitly coordinated with bombings by this new “splinter group,” called “Ahrar-ul-Hind.”  

“Oh look…those terrorists can’t be TTP or al-qaeda, since they are negotiating “PEACE.”

This strategy is “getting old,” because the Pak Army has used this strategy so often, to feign “deniability,” simply by renaming the group. 

Most of these elements are actually IMU terrorists, rebranded over and over, since being relocated to S. Waziristan by the CIA and ISI, in the legendary Kunduz airlift (SEE: The Getaway, by Seymour M. Hersh).

This has always been the way it works—whenever military “proxy militias” (terrorists) either become outdated, or too hot to handle, because of negative press, then the hardcore nucleus of the group is saved, or “airlifted-out” by CIA affiliates, in order to regroup with a new name and new funding.  The “bad guys” are now defunct, according to the official lies  (SEE: Pak. Army Slowly Building New “Pakistani Taliban” Cover StoryIslamabad: TTP leaders evacuated by mysterious airliftsBritish Relocating Insurgents from Helmand to Kunduz, Let the Germans Deal With Them ).

Pakistan is, and shall forever remain, the primary outlet for CIA terrorism, and all of that manufactured terror is committed by trained military professionals.]

Al-Qaida, Jundullah, announce ceasefire in Pakistan

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 Al-Qaida, Jundullah, announce ceasefire in Pakistan

Peshawar- After Tehreek e Taliban Pakistan (TTP), two more militant groups have agreed over ceasefire for a limited time in Pakistan, according to local media quoting sources reported today.

The talks between Taliban Shura and the dialogue committee in North Waziristan bearing fruit, some analysts claim.

Two militant outfits,  Al-Qaida and Jundullah, have agreed over ceasefire in Pakistan, in a joint meeting held somewhere in Afghanistan.

Commander of Jundullah militant outfit, who had claimed an attack in Peshawar cinema, has announced that al-Qaida and Jundullah groups have suspended terrorist attacks in Pakistan for a limited time period.

Commander Ahmed Marwat said that the decision was made in a joint meeting of the two militant groups in Afghanistan, which was also attended by al-Qaida leader Ahmed Yahya Ghaden.

The groups have ceased their operations in Pakistan for a limited time-span, reports said.

Pak Taliban Uphold “Ceasefire,” By Blowing-Up Islamabad Court

ISLAMABAD (AP) – A group of armed men, including two suicide attackers, stormed a court complex in the Pakistani capital on Monday in a rare terror attack in the heart of Islamabad that killed 11 people and wounded dozens.

No one immediately claimed responsibility for the assault, which came just days after the Pakistani Taliban announced a one-month ceasefire, raising questions about the group’s ability to control its various factions. Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif has been trying to negotiate a peace settlement with militants in the northwest who have waged a bloody war against the government for years.

Witnesses spoke of attackers wielding automatic weapons running into the narrow alleyways in the sleepy capital’s court complex, hurling grenades and opening fire indiscriminately on lawyers, judges and court personnel.

One lawyer described it as a scene from hell, with blasts and firing all around. “My colleague was shot, and there was no one to help him. When I reached him, he was bleeding and crying for help,” said Momin Ali.

There were conflicting reports on how many attackers were involved in the incident and if any of them had managed to escape from the police. It also remained unclear if anyone had been arrested, how the attackers penetrated so deep into the city and whether a specific person in the complex was the intended target.

Initial reports suggested two men wearing explosive vests rushed into the court complex, threw hand grenades and started shooting, then blew themselves up, said Islamabad Police Chief Sikander Hayat. He put the death toll at 11.

“It was certainly an act of terrorism,” Hayat said. One of the attackers blew himself up outside the office of the lawyers’ union president and the other outside the door of a judge’s office, he added.

The explosions sent lawyers and judges running in fear for their lives as police stormed in. Police subsequently searched the entire complex and found no additional attackers, said Hayat.

Other officials and a lawyer on the scene said there were more than two attackers. Police official Jamil Hashmi said there were about six to eight attackers who spread into different areas of the court complex.

“One of the attackers entered a courtroom and shot and killed a judge,” Hashmi said.

Lawyer Murad Ali said he saw several attackers walking toward a courtroom, brandishing weapons.

“They had automatic weapons. They had hand grenades,” he said. “I saw them shooting a female lawyer.”

His hands were splattered in blood that he said came from helping remove four dead bodies. Another lawyer, Sardar Gul Nawaz, said the attackers had short beards and wore shalwar kameez, a traditional Pakistani outfit of baggy pants and a long tunic.

The dead included two judges and five lawyers, said Dr. Altaf at the Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences in Islamabad where the dead and wounded were taken. Altaf, who spoke to television reporters and only gave his family name, said most of the victims had bullet wounds. He said 25 were wounded, five of them critically.

The area where the attack occurred is a warren of walkways filled with judges’ chambers, lawyers’ offices and restaurants and businesses catering to the legal community. The walkways are filled with copying machines for clerks and clients to make copies of legal documents, and prisoners wearing chains can often be seen walking through the complex on their way to and from court. Families of suspects on trial also often stand around the area, waiting for their loved ones to appear in court. Some spots in the complex have metal detectors, which are often not used.

Pakistani television showed images of the area with windows blown out, walls torn and lawyers in traditional black suits carrying what appeared to be lifeless bodies and wounded from the buildings. Policemen with weapons raised ran through the area and searched offices.

Body parts and blood mingled with pieces of shattered glass littered the ground outside the courtrooms and attorney’s offices. The police cordoned off the complex, which was taken over by commandos from the police anti-terrorist force.

The attack was a shock to Islamabad, which has mostly been spared the frequent bombings and shootings prevalent in other parts of Pakistan such as Peshawar near the tribal areas or the port city of Karachi.

The peace process has proceeded in fits and starts but seemed to get a boost on Saturday, when the Pakistani Taliban announced they would implement a one-month ceasefire after the military pounded their hideouts with airstrikes.

The militant group was quick to distance itself from Monday’s attack. A spokesman for the organization in a telephone call to an Associated Press reporter said the group was not involved in the assault and restated his group’s commitment to the ceasefire.

But the attack highlighted the difficulty in negotiating a peace deal with a multi-faceted group like the Pakistani Taliban, made up of varying factions. Analysts say that while some in the group may want to negotiate a peace deal, other factions may not, making it difficult to enforce a peace deal across all the factions. The cease-fire did not include other groups, such as al-Qaida, that operate in Pakistan.

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Associated Press writer Ishtiaq Mahsud in Dera Ismail Khan and Asif Shahzad contributed to this report.

Pakistani Taliban Brutally Demonstrate Their Cruel, Hypocritical Nature

[SEE:  Pakistani Taliban announces ceasefire to revive peace talks]

Three bomb blasts targeting polio team kill 12

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imagePESHAWAR: Twelve people were killed and 11 injured when three roadside bombs targeting a polio vaccination team in Jamroud Tehsil exploded Saturday, officials said, in the latest attack on efforts to combat the crippling disease.

Militant strikes and threats of violence have badly hampered campaigns to stamp out polio in Pakistan.

Eleven paramilitary troops and one child died after the bombs detonated in the Lashora area of Jamroud Tehsil in Khyber tribal district, 30 kilometres (18 miles) southwest of the city of Peshawar, senior administration official Jahangir Khan told AFP.

The troops were protecting a convoy of health workers who were on their way to administer anti-polio drops to children as part of a three-day campaign against polio that started Friday, he said.

“A convoy of three vehicles was taking polio workers to administer the drops and the bombs exploded after the first vehicle that was carrying polio workers crossed the spot,” Khan said.

He added that two vehicles belonging to the medical team were also damaged in the explosions.

Samim Jan, chief of the government-run hospital in Jamroud, confirmed the causalities.

“Twelve dead bodies and three injured were brought here, one of the injured is in critical condition,” he told AFP.

Jan also said that eight of the injured have been shifted to Hayatabad Medical Complex in Peshawar.

Rehman Khan, a senior health official in Khyber tribal district, said the polio campaign has been temporarily suspended in the Jamroud area.

“We will resume administering of polio drops when the security situation is better,” he told AFP.

Nobody has claimed responsibility for the attack so far.

Militant groups see vaccination campaigns as a cover for espionage, and there are also long-running rumours about polio drops causing infertility.

Copyright AFP (Agence France-Presse), 2014

Pakistani Press Cowardice Documented In Taliban Squelching of Express Tribune Reporting

Liberal newspaper Express Tribune cowed into silence by Pakistani Taliban

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Media group opts for self-censorship on terrorism after Taliban admits murder of three employees for critical reports on militants

Imran Khan speaks to the media after appearing before the Supreme Court in Islamabad

Imran Khan, former cricketer and head of Tehrik-e-Insaf, which is spared criticism because it opposes attacks on the Pakistani Taliban. Photo: Faisal Mahmood/Reuters
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When it was launched four years ago, the Express Tribune set out to become the house newspaper of liberal-minded Pakistanis.

A newcomer to a market dominated by conservative-inclined papers, it made a point of writing about everything from the relentless rise of religious extremism to gay rights.

But in recent weeks the paper has been cowed into silence by an unusually blatant display of power by the Pakistani Taliban.

The paper was forced to drastically tone down its coverage last month after three employees of the media group, which includes another newspaper and television channel, were killed in Karachi by men armed with pistols and silencers on 17 January.

The attack was later claimed by the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), a large coalition of militant groups, which accused the media group of disseminating anti-Taliban propaganda.

Immediately following the killings, the paper’s editor, Kamal Siddiqi, sent an email to staff outlining the paper’s new policy.

Henceforth there would be “nothing against any militant organisationand its allies like the Jamaat-e-Islami, religious parties and the Tehrik-e-Insaf”, the rightwing party led by Imran Khan, that strongly opposes military operations against the TTP.

There would also be “nothing on condemning any terrorist attack”, “nothing against TTP or its statements” and “no opinion piece/cartoon on terrorism, militancy, the military, military operations, terror attacks”.

Reporters have been banned from describing a movement responsible for the deaths of thousands of civilians, soldiers and police as “outlawed” or “militant”.

The terrorist attacks that rack the country on an almost daily basis are covered on the news pages, but are pared down.

“We do have exclusives, but we don’t run them,” Siddiqi said. “It’s very frustrating at a personal level for all journalists. But we have decided that we won’t do anything at least for the foreseeable future that will come back to haunt us.”

Other changes include a more conservative approach to photographs of female models in the paper’s lifestyle sections and weekend magazine.

Worst affected are the opinion pages. Once-feisty leader writers have almost entirely overlooked the near-continuous attacks that have rocked the country in recent weeks.

Ayesha Siddiqa, a regular columnist, said the muzzling of Pakistan’s media was contributing to an “absolutely mesmerising information deficit” among the public.

“I said to the editor, ‘what am I to do, start writing about cooking or films?’ Because that’s all that’s left.”

The killings followed a bomb and small-arms attack on the company’s offices in Karachi in December. One reporter on the paper said the attacks had terrified many colleagues.

“The paper has an unusually young staff and a lot of the kids were pretty scared, with parents telling them they should quit,” the staff writer said. “There were some people who said we should fight back, but they were a minority.”

After the killings, a TTP spokesman, Ehsanullah Ehsan, was allowed to join by telephone a live discussion programme on the paper’s sister television station, Express News.

He claimed responsibility for the killings, complained the company “was playing the role of propagandist in this war with the Taliban” and said it had ignored regular complaints he had emailed to the channel.

The TV show’s host, Javed Chaudhry, promised that the station and newspaper would take pains to present the TTP’s position “without any trimming”.

“We will have a balanced and impartial attitude towards you and will convey your point of view to the people but we have only one request: that our colleagues should be protected,” he told the TTP spokesman and watching audience.

The TTP has threatened and attacked journalists in the past, including the BBC after its Urdu-language service aired highly critical comment about the Taliban attempt to assassinate the schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai in 2012.

Although much of Pakistan’s national debate is conducted in the country’s generally right-leaning Urdu press and television, the TTP monitors everything.

Ali Dayan Hasan, of Human Rights Watch, said: “The Taliban and other armed groups have threatened the media over their coverage for several years, but now those threats are ratcheting up by accompanying attacks.

“It’s an extremely effective tactic that does far more than just censorship, it also skews the entire national debate.”

Siddiqi, the editor, said he could not risk any more lives.

“The fact is three people have been killed and no one out there is protecting us,” he said, pointing out that no arrests had been made in connection with either of the attacks on the company.

“We are on our own. We have to look out for our own people.”

Another Infamous Pakistani Militant Is Killed for the Second Time

[EXPOSING AMERICAN FRAUD]

[Another Taliban leader killed for the second time (SEE: 56 killed in shelling by fighter aircraft, helicopters ).  The continual repetition of this demonstrated pattern of the alleged re-killing of famous militants, either confirms the total and complete unreliability of those Pak spies who identify drone victims for the Western press, or else it confirms consistent Pentagon lying about the alleged “successes” of its drone murder program.  The Pentagon never really knows for sure “who” it kills in these strikes, or whether any militants were killed at all in the isolated mountains, even though nearly every publicized strike is linked with a known militant name.  The sheer number of the drone murders -vs- the limited number of known militant names in Pakistan, necessitates the re-running of the names of the alleged victims.]   

Top Pakistan Taliban commander Asmatullah Shaheen ‘shot dead

BBC

File photo of Asmatullah Shaheen Bhittani Shaheen was driving in North Waziristan when he was attacked, reports said

A senior Pakistani Taliban commander has been shot dead in a militant stronghold near the Afghan border, security sources and relatives say.

Asmatullah Shaheen was ambushed as he drove through a village near Miranshah in North Waziristan, reports said. Two others in the vehicle also died.

It is unclear who killed them. There has been no word from the militants.

Shaheen was briefly the Pakistani Taliban interim leader after its chief Hakimullah Mehsud was killed last year.

Asmatullah Shaheen, who came from the small Bhittani tribe, shot to prominence in December 2011 when his men kidnapped and killed about 15 security force personnel.

The BBC’s M Ilyas Khan in Islamabad says he is believed to have depended on the much larger Mehsud tribe for his clout in militant circles.

Saudi Royals On the Run from Real “Islamists,” Look To Rawalpindi for Salvation

[Fearing a repeat of the Grand Mosque Takeover in 1979, the Saudis are starting to wise-up to the revolutionary nature of the “Islamist” fire that they are playing with in Syria.  The choice to weaponize “Islam,” in order to raise their nightmare pipe dream of an “Islamist NATO” of “holy warriors,” was always a very great dangerous gamble for the royals.  The great risk was that the Arab royals might accidentally raise an army of true “militant Islamist” believers, who fight for “Allah,” rather than an army of mercenary pseudo-Islamists.  A true Jihadi Army would recognize that the corrupt Wahhabi regime was an even greater evil than Bashar al-Asad and direct their fire at Riyadh.  

The Islamist fighters of Juhayman al-Otaibi and his “Ikhwan” (Muslim Brotherhood) seized the Grand Mosque because they believed it was being corrupted by the Saud regime.  The seige was a first step in a global “Holy War.”  Seizing the mosque was intended to bring-down the corrupt regime in Riyadh.  Had the tenacious Muslim fighters (who had no fear of death) been able to hold-out against the royals’ countermeasures, then the sacred Jihadi fire would have been ignited in Saudi Arabia, instead of in the mountains of Afghanistan, where Riyadh managed to safely deflect it, with the help of Pakistan.  If truth would be known, we would now understand that Islamabad provided much more strategic aid to Riyadh in 1979 than just providing the special forces soldiers who flushed the militants out of the web of tunnels underneath the Kaaba area.  Pakistan provided Riyadh an “Islamist relief valve” along the Durand Line.  Without that “safety valve,” to channel the wave of militant “weaponized” Islam, it would have exploded all over the Sunni Muslim world.  It would have been like it is now, with revolutionary jihadism popping-up everywhere that social tensions have built up.  The Pentagon war plan for its terror war has produced this result, basically creating the circumstances required to bring-about the “global caliphate” that it had been warning us about. 

The Pentagon Paradox, it dreams-up an impossible danger, then makes it become real.

Riyadh is once again looking to Pakistan to save it from the Frankenstein monsters that it has created (SEE:  Bolstering ties: Riyadh seeks enhanced security collaboration)].  Pakistan, with assistance from the US, helped Riyadh to channel the militant “Islamists” fever of Juhayman and the Brotherhood into an anti-communist “Jihad” in Afghanistan.  The Saudis foolishly thought that they could control an army of “holy warriors” with money, even though they only fight for Islam do the same against another Muslim government without exposing themselves as the true “Enemy of Islam.”]

Saudi Arabia’s Shadow War

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The Kingdom is turning to Pakistan to train Syria’s rebels. It’s a partnership that once went very wrong in Afghanistan. Will history repeat itself?

BY David Kenner

BEIRUT — Saudi Arabia, having largely abandoned hope that the United States will spearhead international efforts to topple the Assad regime, is embarking on a major new effort to train Syrian rebel forces. And according to three sources with knowledge of the program, Riyadh has enlisted the help of Pakistani instructors to do it.

Pakistan and Saudi Arabia, along with the CIA, also supported the Afghan rebels against the Soviet-backed government during the 1980s. That collaboration contains a cautionary note for the current day: The fractured Afghan rebels were unable to govern after the old regime fell, paving the way for chaos and the rise of the Taliban. Some of the insurgents, meanwhile, transformed into al Qaeda and eventually turned their weapons against their former patrons.

While the risk of blowback has been discussed in Riyadh, Saudis with knowledge of the training program describe it as an antidote to extremism, not a potential cause of it. They have described the kingdom’s effort as having two goals — toppling the Assad regime, and weakening al Qaeda-linked groups in the country. Prince Turki, the former Saudi intelligence chief and envoy to Washington, said in a recent interview that the mainstream opposition must be strengthened so that it could protect itself “these extremists who are coming from all over the place” to impose their own ideologies on Syria.

The ramped up Saudi effort has been spurred by the kingdom’s disillusionment with the United States. A Saudi insider with knowledge of the program described how Riyadh had determined to move ahead with its plans after coming to the conclusion that President Barack Obama was simply not prepared to move aggressively to oust Assad. “We didn’t know if the Americans would give [support] or not, but nothing ever came through,” the source said. “Now we know the president just didn’t want it.”

Pakistan’s role is so far relatively small, though another source with knowledge of Saudi thinking said that a plan was currently being debated to give Pakistan responsibility for training two rebel brigades, or around 5,000 to 10,000 fighters. Carnegie Middle East Center fellow Yezid Sayigh first noted the use of Pakistani instructors, writing that the Saudis were planning to build a Syrian rebel army of roughly 40,000 to 50,000 soldiers.

“The only way Assad will think about giving up power is if he’s faced with the threat of a credible, armed force,” said the Saudi insider.

A State Department official declined to comment on the Saudi training program.

Saudi Arabia’s decision to move forward with training the Syrian rebels independent of the United States is the latest sign of a split between the two longtime allies. In Syria, Saudi officials were aggrieved by Washington’s decision to cancel a strike on the Assad regime in reprisal for its chemical weapons attack on the Damascus suburbs this summer. A top Saudi official told the Washington Post that Saudi intelligence chief Prince Bandar bin Sultan was unaware of the cancelation of the strike. “We found about it from CNN,” he said.

As a result, Saudi Arabia has given up on hopes that the United States would spearhead efforts to topple Assad and decided to press forward with its own plans to bolster rebel forces. That effort relies on a network of Saudi allies in addition to Pakistan, such as Jordan, the United Arab Emirates, and France.

As Sayigh laid out in his Carnegie paper, Saudi Arabia is attempting to build “a new national army” for the rebels — a force with an “avowedly Sunni ideology” that could seize influence from mainstream Syrian opposition groups. In addition to its training program in Jordan, Saudi Arabia also helped organize the unification of roughly 50 rebel brigades into “the Army of Islam” under the leadership of Zahran Alloush, a Salafist commander whose father is a cleric based in the kingdom.

Given the increased Islamization of rebel forces on the ground, analysts say, it only makes sense that Saudi Arabia would throw its support behind Salafist groups. These militias “happen to be the most strategically powerful organizations on the ground,” said Charles Lister, an analyst with IHS Jane’s Terrorism and Insurgency Centre. “If Saudi Arabia does indeed follow such a strategy… it could well stand to become a major power player in the conflict.”

In calling on Pakistan to assist in toppling Assad, Saudi Arabia can draw on its deep alliance with Islamabad. The two countries have long shared defense ties: Saudi Arabia has given more aid to Pakistani than to any non-Arab country, according to former CIA officer Bruce Riedel, and also allegedly helped fund Islamabad’s nuclear program. In return, Pakistan based troops in Saudi Arabia multiple times over three decades to protect the royals’ grip on power.

The current Pakistani government, in particular, is closely tied to Saudi Arabia. Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif was ousted from power in 1999 by a military coup – the Saudis allegedly brokered a deal that kept him from prison. Sharif would spend the next seven years in exile, mainly in Saudi Arabia. “For the Saudis, Sharif is a key partner in a key allied state,” said Arif Rafiq, an adjunct scholar at the Middle East Institute.

But despite close collaboration in the past, Saudi Arabia may find its old allies chafing at the sheer scope of its ambitions in Syria. One Pakistani source with close ties to military circles confirmed that Saudi Arabia had requested assistance on Syria over the summer — but argued that Pakistani capabilities and interests were not conducive to a sweeping effort to train the rebels.

Pakistan is already grappling with its own sectarian bloodshed and must mind its relationship with Iran, while its foreign policy is focused on negotiations with the Taliban over the future of Afghanistan and its longtime rivalry with India. “They have their hands full,” the source said. “And even if they want to, I don’t think they’ll be able to give much concrete help.”

Jordan is also reportedly leery about fielding a large Syrian rebel army on its soil. The ambitious Saudi plan would require a level of support from Amman “that is opposed within the security and military establishment and is unlikely to be implemented,” according to Sayigh.

As the Saudis expand their effort to topple Assad, analysts say the central challenge is not to inflict tactical losses on the Syrian army, but to organize a coherent force that can coordinate its actions across the country. In other words, if Riyadh hopes to succeed where others have failed, it needs to get the politics right — convincing the fragmented rebel groups, and their squabbling foreign patrons, to work together in pursuit of a shared goal.

It’s easier said than done. “The biggest problem facing the Saudis now is the same one facing the U.S., France, and anyone else interested in helping the rebels: the fragmentation of the rebels into groups fighting each other for local and regional dominance rather than cooperating to overthrow Assad,” said David Ottaway, a scholar at the Wilson Center who wrote a biography of Prince Bandar. “Could the Saudis force [the rebel groups] to cooperate? I have my doubts.”

STR/AFP/GettyImages