Time to grab guns and kill damn Russians – Tymoshenko in leaked tape

Time to grab guns and kill damn Russians – Tymoshenko in leaked tape

Russia-Today

Yulia Tymoshenko (Reuters/Cathal McNaughton)

Ukrainians must take up arms against Russians so that not even scorched earth will be left where Russia stands; an example of former Ukrainian PM Yulia Tymoshenko’s vitriol in phone call leaked online.

Tymoshenko confirmed the authenticity of the conversation on Twitter, while pointing out that a section where she is heard to call for the nuclear slaughter of the eight million Russians who remain on Ukrainian territory was edited.

She tweeted “The conversation took place, but the ‘8 million Russians in Ukraine’ piece is an edit. In fact, I said Russians in Ukraine – are Ukrainians. Hello FSB :) Sorry for the obscene language.”

The former Ukrainian PM has not clarified who exactly she wants to nuke.

Shufrych’s press service flatly contradicted Tymoshenko, slamming the tape as fake. The press release reads “The conversation didn’t take place,” as quoted by korrespondent.net.The phone conversation with Nestor Shufrych, former deputy secretary of the National Security and Defense Council of Ukraine, was uploaded on YouTube on Monday by user Sergiy Vechirko.

The leaked phone call took placed on March 18, hours after the Crimea & Sevastopol accession treaty was signed in the Kremlin.

While Shufrych was “just shocked,” Tymoshenko was enraged by the results of the Crimean referendum .

“This is really beyond all boundaries. It’s about time we grab our guns and kill go kill those damn Russians together with their leader,” Tymoshenko said.

The ex-pm declared if she was in charge “there would be no f***ing way that they would get Crimea then.”

Shufrych made the valid point that Ukraine “didn’t have any force potential” to keep Crimea.

But Tymoshenko, who plans to run in Ukraine’s presidential election, expressed confidence that she would have found “a way to kill those a*****es.”

“I hope I will be able to get all my connections involved. And I will use all of my means to make the entire world raise up, so that there wouldn’t be even a scorched field left in Russia,” she promised.

Despite being incapacitated by spinal disc hernia the ex-PM stressed she’s ready to “grab a machine gun and shoot that m*********er in the head.”

Tymoshenko rose to power as a key figure in the pro-European Orange Revolution in 2004, becoming Ukrainian prime minister 2007-2010.

She was imprisoned in 2012, under president Viktor Yanukovich, after being found guilty of exceeding her authority by signing a gas supply and transit deal with Russia.

The deal is claimed to have cost Ukraine’s national oil and gas company, Naftogaz, around US$170 million.

Tymoshenko served part of her seven-year sentence in prison before being relocated to a Kharkov hospital.

She was released immediately after the Kiev coup which ousted Yanukovich.

This is not the first telephone leak scandal since the Ukrainian turmoil began last November.

In February, a tape was revealed, in which US Assistant Secretary of State for Europe,

Victoria Nuland, said “F**k the EU” as she was discussing the formation of the future Ukrainian government with the US ambassador to the country, Geoffrey Pyatt.

And at the beginning of March a phone conversation between EU Foreign Affairs Сhief, Catherine Ashton, and Estonian foreign affairs minister, Urmas Paet, was made public.

Speaking with Ashton, Paet stressed that there was suspicion that the snipers in Kiev, who shot at protesters and police in Kiev might have been hired by Maidan leaders.

Crimea’s regional assembly has officially applied to become part of Russia

A man fills out registration papers before casting his vote in a mobile ballot box during voting in a referendum in the village of Pionerskoye, near Simferopol, Crimea, Ukraine, March 16, 2014.

Crimea Applies to Join Russia

voa

VOA News

March 17, 2014

Crimea’s regional assembly has officially applied to become part of Russia, a day after a referendum in southern Ukraine overwhelmingly supported joining the Russian Federation. Crimea’s parliament approved the measure Monday.

The United States and its European allies are expected to announce sanctions Monday against Russia.

President Barack Obama told his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin Sunday that Washington and its “European partners are prepared to impose additional costs” on Moscow for backing the secession referendum in Ukraine’s Crimean peninsula.

A White House statement called Sunday’s referendum illegal and said it violates Ukraine’s constitution. It also said the vote will “never be recognized by the United States and the international community.”

Crimea’s election chief announced Monday that nearly 97 percent of the voters cast ballots supporting secession and a move to join Russia. However, those opposed to the move had been advised to boycott the referendum.

In Kyiv, Ukraine’s interim Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk – speaking at an emergency cabinet meeting – called the Moscow-backed Crimea vote “a circus spectacle” directed at gunpoint by Russia.

An earlier White House statement said no decision should be made about the future of Ukraine without the Ukrainian national government.

It also said the presidential elections planned for May 25 will provide a legitimate opportunity for all Ukrainians to make their voices heard on the future of their country.

Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov on Sunday agreed to push for Ukrainian constitutional reforms for power sharing and decentralization as a solution to the crisis.

The Duma set to act

Meanwhile, Russia’s lower house of parliament will pass legislation allowing Ukraine’s Crimea region to join Russia “in the very near future”, Interfax news agency quoted the chamber’s deputy speaker as saying on Monday.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has said he will respect the will of the people in Crimea, ignoring Western leaders who say the referendum was illegal because Russian forces have seized the southern region.

“The results of the referendum in Crimea clearly showed that residents of Crimea see their future only as part of Russia,” the deputy speaker of the State Duma, Sergei Neverov, was quoted as saying.

Duma officials claim the Black Sea peninsula can become a member of the Russian Federation under current legislation, specifically under a law “On the procedure for the adoption into the Russian Federation and education of new subjects of the Russian Federation” that was passed in 2001, Interfax said.

First, Crimea’s appeal to join Russia will be sent to Putin. If approved, Putin will then pass it to the upper and lower houses of parliament, which will work on a treaty to be signed between Russia and the new state.

Under the treaty, a transitional period could be set for the new subject to be integrated into Russia’s economic, financial, credit and legal systems.

Following its signing, Russia’s constitutional court should then verify the treaty. It should then be voted on by both houses of parliament, the Duma and the Federation Council.

“I do not think there will be any delays in considering these questions in either the State Duma or Federation Council. We are ready to pass all the required legal decisions as quickly as possible,” the Federation Council’s deputy speaker, Ilyas Umakhanov, told Rossiya-24 television.

Situation on the ground

In Kyiv, Ukraine’s acting defense minister told reporters that both Ukraine and Russia have agreed on a truce in Crimea until March 21.

Sunday’s vote came a day after Russian forces seized a natural gas facility just outside Crimean territory.  The Ukrainian Foreign Ministry called the move “a military invasion by Russia.”

Ukraine provides the peninsula with all of its water and energy needs, and some analysts say the seizure may be aimed at ensuring the peninsula’s energy requirements are met in the event Kyiv were to cut off supplies.

Crimea is a primarily ethnic-Russian region within Ukraine.  Moscow says it has the right to protect the interests of ethnic Russians in Crimea.

Ukraine’s Foreign Ministry said Saturday Russian forces have seized the Ukrainian village of Strilkove, near the Crimean border.

There are no reports of shots being fired, but the ministry called the takeover an “invasion” and demands that Russian soldiers leave.  Ukrainian border guards say the Russians are guarding a gas pumping station in the town.

Reactions in Kyiv

Thousands of Ukrainians gathered in central Kyiv Sunday to voice opposition to the referendum and what the perceive as Moscow’s moves to divide the Ukraine.

But the mood was somber as many Ukrainians feel helpless against Russia’s might and military superiority, many fearing a further escalation of tensions.

Irina, a restaurant manager who only gave her first name, said Crimea’s fate likely was already decided in Moscow.

She said none of this was right. This could have been done in a nice way, in an honest way, she said. This could have been done in a constitutionally correct way. And it seems to me, she said, everyone would have agreed to that.

Moscow claims it is protecting ethnic Russians from persecution by Ukrainian “extremists” who it says illegitimately came to power after months of anti-government protests.

Another Kyiv resident, Ira, who also only gave her first name, said she had nothing against Russians.

She said she loves and respects the Russian people as much as Ukrainians, but not their government. She expressed hope that everything ends well, everyone becomes united, and that Crimea remains with Ukraine.

VOA’s Daniel Schearf contribited to this report from Kyiv. Some of this report was contributed by Reuters.

The Dangerous Nazification of Ukrainian Airwaves

[Ukrainian TV HAS to be even more boring than Russian TV.  Let’s see how long Svoboda can contain the restless longings of the Ukrainian masses if they are all bored beyond the point of their capacity to be mesmerized by inanity.]

OSCE slams Ukraine’s repressive censorship of Russian TV channels

Russia-Today

Neo Nazi Svoboda leader Oleh Tyahnybok

The OSCE has criticised Kiev’s “repressive” move to shut down the broadcasting of Russian TV channels after the media watchdog reported over 50% of providers have already fulfilled the order allegedly aimed at “ensuring national security and sovereignty.”

“As of 11:00 GMT, March 11th, 50 percent of providers throughout Ukraine have disabled broadcasting of foreign channels,” others are preparing to follow, the National Television and Radio Broadcasting Council of Ukraine, said on its website.

The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe has voiced strong concerns over the decision.

“I repeat my call to the authorities not to initiate these repressive measures,” OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media Dunja Mijatović said. “Banning programming without a legal basis is a form of censorship; national security concerns should not be used at the expense of media freedom.”

“While I deplore any kind of state propaganda and hate speech as part of the current information war, everyone has the right to receive information from as many sources as he or she wishes,” Mijatovic said. “Switching off and banning channels is not the way to address these problems; any potentially problematic speech should be countered with arguments and more speech.”

So far at least 5 Russian channels have been excluded from the list of options, following an appeal by the National Security and Defense Council of Ukraine last week.

“The National Television and Radio Broadcasting Council of Ukraine requires the program service providers to stop the broadcast of the Russian TV channels Vesti, Russia 24, Channel One (worldwide transmission), RTR ‘Planeta’, and NTV-World in their network,” the National Council order says.

More than half of Ukraine’s population speaks Russian regularly and one third say it’s their native tongue. In Crimea over 90 percent of the population uses Russian on an everyday basis.

Participants of a rally on Yevpatoria's central square voice their support to Russia. (RIA Novosti/Andrey Stenin)Participants of a rally on Yevpatoria’s central square voice their support to Russia. (RIA Novosti/Andrey Stenin)

On Sunday, Republic of Crimea began broadcasting Russian TV channels on frequencies earlier occupied by Ukrainian television. It has been done because of “legal reasons and moral principles,” Crimea’s information minister Dmitry Polonsky told Itar-tass.

“From the moral point of view, all Ukrainian TV channels were rigidly censored by Kiev’s illegitimate authorities. In violation of fundamental principles they broadcast only one point of view – Crimean politicians, community leaders and Crimeans were unable to comment on the situation,” Polonsky said, adding that their round the clock false reporting of “Russia occupying Crimea” or “declaring war on Ukraine” did not correspond to reality and was used to aggravate the situation and escalate violence.

Polonsky also said that existing contracts should be brought into line with the “current legal situation”, as he urged Ukrainian TV channels to renegotiate contracts for new frequencies with the Crimean broadcasting authorities.

Following the move Ukraine’s media watchdog Goskomteleradio demanded an immediate resumption of Ukrainian TV channels broadcast in Crimea, accusing Russia of “aggression.”

“We regard this as a manifestation of undisguised information aggression against Ukraine by the Russian Federation,” the statement reads.

Russia has long voiced concerns over banning Russian media broadcasts on Ukraine’s national frequencies, calling it a violation of human rights.

“We are aware of proposals to prohibit broadcasts in Ukraine by companies of countries that are not signatories to the European Broadcasting Convention,” Russian foreign minister Sergey Lavrov said late February after the proposal to ban some channels were first introduced by Svoboda Party in Ukraine.

“Russia is not a signatory to this convention, but this circumstance has not stopped us from broadcasting across Europe. Such broadcasts have not encountered any problems in any country of the European Union. If such a decision is adopted in Ukraine, it will be serious violation of freedom of speech,” Lavrov added.

Why Is World War II Being Rekindled in Ukraine?

Why There Will Be War in Ukraine

Moscow Times

The current crisis is not about Crimea. It is about the rights of Russian-speakers throughout Ukraine whom the Kremlin wants to protect from violence and discrimination. Russia does not want a military intervention in Crimea and does not want to take Crimea from Ukraine.

There is a political solution to this crisis. First, create a coalition government in Kiev composed of all parties, including those from the east and south of the country. The current government is dominated by anti-Russian extremists from western Ukraine.

If the extremists who seized power in Kiev do not accept Russia’s democratic proposals, Russia will likely be forced to revert to military means to solve the crisis in Ukraine.

Second, Ukraine needs to draft a democratic constitution that has guarantees for Ukraine’s Russian-speaking population that would grant official status to the Russian language and establish the principle of federalism.

Third, presidential and parliamentary elections must be held soon. Independent election observers must play an active role in ensuring that the elections are free and fair. There is a real danger that they will be manipulated by the neo-Nazi militants who de facto seized power in a coup.

If these democratic and peaceful solutions to the crisis in Ukraine are rejected by the opposition forces that have seized power in Kiev, I am afraid that Russia will have no other choice but to revert to military means. If the junta leaders want to avoid war, they need to adopt Moscow’s peaceful and democratic proposals and adhere to them.

Those currently in power in Kiev are carrying out a political strategy that is not so much pro-European as it is anti-Russian, as evidenced by the surprisingly heavy-handed tactics the U.S. and European Union  have employed in Ukraine. In the end, a minority executed a violent coup that removed the democratically elected and legitimate president of Ukraine.

The Kremlin believes that the current Ukrainian leadership will manipulate the elections planned for May 25 to install a single leader or coalition government functioning much as former Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili did in Tbilisi. A “Ukrainian Saakashvili” will unleash an even more repressive campaign of intimidation against Russian-speakers, one that over several years would stoke anti-Russia hysteria among the general population.

After that, Kiev may evict Russia’s Black Sea Fleet from Sevastopol and purge Crimea of any Russian influence. Ukraine could easily become a radicalized, anti-Russian state, at which point Kiev will fabricate a pretext to justify taking subversive action against Moscow. This looks especially likely considering that ruling coalition members from the neo-fascist Svoboda and Right Sector parties have already made territorial claims against Russia. They could easily send their army of activists to Russia to join local separatists and foment rebellion in the North Caucasus and other unstable regions in Russia. In addition, Russia’s opposition movement will surely want to use the successful experience and technology of the Euromaidan protests and, with the help and financial support of the West, try to carry out their own revolution in Moscow. The goal: to remove President Vladimir Putin from power and install a puppet leadership that will sell Russia’s strategic interests out to the West in the same way former President Boris Yeltsin did in the 1990s.

The official census puts the Russian minority in Ukraine at 16 percent of the total population, although that number was falsified. The actual number is closer to 25 percent. Surveys indicate that 45 percent of the country’s population speak Russian at home, 45 percent speak Ukrainian and 10 percent speak both languages. In the most recent Gallup survey, when asked in which language they would like to be polled, 83 percent of respondents chose Russian. Taking into account the rural population in western and central Ukraine, about 75 percent of the people, probably speak Russian. Of that 75 percent, only about 10 percent are those in Kiev and a few other major cities who supported the protests. This means that only 35 percent of the population are attempting to impose its will on the remaining 65 percent, using a violent coup to achieve their goals.

Putin made the right decision: He did not to wait for that attack and took preventative measures. Many in the West say the Kremlin’s reactions were paranoiac, but Germany’s Jews also thought the same of leaving the country in 1934. Most of them chose to believe they were safe and remained in Germany even after Hitler came to power. The infamous Kristallnacht took place five years later, one of the first early chapters in the “Final Solution.” Similarly, just four years remain until Russia’s presidential election in 2018, and there is a strong risk that subversive forces within and outside Russia will try to overthrow Putin, in part using their new foothold in Ukraine.

Will there be war in Ukraine? I am afraid so. After all, the extremists who seized power in Kiev want to see a bloodbath. Only fear for their own lives might stop them from inciting such a conflict. Russia is prepared to move its forces into southern and eastern Ukraine if repressive measures are used against the Russian-speaking population or if a military intervention occurs. Russia will not annex Crimea. It has enough territory already. At the same time, however, it will also not stand by passively while Russophobic and neo-Nazi gangs hold the people of Crimea, Kharkiv and Donetsk at their mercy.

Sergei Markov is director of the Institute of Political Studies.

En Masse, Ukrainian Soldiers Swear Allegiance To Crimean Govt

Ukrainian Army servicemen en masse pledging allegiance to new Crimean government

itar tass

“Everyone who doesn’t obey will be held accountable to the full extent of the law”, – Prime Minister Sergei Aksyonov underlined
EPA/MAXIM SHIPENKOV

SIMFEROPOL, ITAR-TASS

Ukrainian Army men and officers deployed in the Crimea are en masse pledging allegiance with the new legitimately elected authorities of the Autonomous Republic, Prime Minister Sergei Aksyonov said in an address Sunday night.

“I am thankful to them for their patriotism, since the military as a special category of people – they have a particularly keen understanding of the dangers of combat operations and I feel confident that they will do everything in their power to prevent bloodshed and to cool off the mischief-making politicians who have taken over Kiev,” he said.

“The military don’t want to be speechless tools in the hands of followers of (Stepan) Bandera (the chieftain of far-right militant Ukrainian nationalist during World War II – Itar-Tass) and won’t take on that role,” Aksyonov said.

“I’d like to warn the commanding officers who might be pushing their soldiers towards wrongful acts that measures envisioned by law will be taken against them,” he said. “Everyone who doesn’t obey will be held accountable to the full extent of the law.

Putin Doctrine in Action

Transfer of forces to Crimea, assignment of soldiers on the border and encouragement of pro-Russian demonstrations. Yakov (Yasha) Kedmi outlines the moves of the Russian President in the struggle for the future of Ukraine

Russia sees in the current events in Ukraine “intervention and a subversive action of the US and Europe” for change of regime through use of force, and an overthrow of a legitimate regime, which was democratically elected.

Putin did not meet with the deposed President Yanukovych, and neither he nor anyone of the Russian leadership has declared any support in the ousted president. Also there was not an official statement of recognition or non-recognition of the new regime. Statements were made only on the seizure of power through brutal violence and on the involvement of radical nationalists and fascist elements.

According to the Russian perception, in Ukraine today there is no central government and the state is dominated with governmental anarchy and lack of stability and security to its citizens. According to Russia’s security doctrine, non-stability of neighboring countries is a threat to the Russian security. Moreover, Russia sees what is happening in Ukraine as a conspiracy planned by the US and NATO, in its ultimate goal to make Ukraine a NATO member state within a certain time.

The expansion of NATO eastward, towards Ukraine, at the risk of placing NATO bases in the territory of Ukraine, first ands foremost missile bases, is preserved by Russia as an existential threat. Apparently, some kind of a Putin Doctrine was expected in Russia, which means zero concessions to the West and the US in their attempt to expand their influence in the territory of the former Soviet Union.

The first indication of the existence of such a doctrine was the war with Georgia. Russia also does not rely on negotiations and agreements with Europe and the US, following the failed attempt of agreement in Libya, and the latest agreement in Ukraine, with guarantees signed by European foreign ministers, violated several hours after it was signed.

Russia decided to openly intervene in Ukraine and to outweigh by itself the governmental status of Ukraine according to its interests. The first step is putting troops in Crimea. About six thousand soldiers were moved into Crimea using the Russian Navy. 10 cargo aircraft were as well positioned in Crimea, 10 fighter jets and 30 APCs (armored personnel carriers). This indicates that Crimea may be a military base for a quick movement of forces to other regions of Ukraine.

In the South-Eastern regions of Ukraine, with considerable Russian population such as Crimea, a local government stabilization process against the Kiev authorities has begun, with a request for assistance from Russia. It is possible that these areas will be inserted with Russian troops as well. In any case those areas began establishing local forces on the basis of military personnel, police and local volunteers, assisted by the Russian army. It is possible, upon completion of the construction of these units, they will begin to move towards other regions of Ukraine to take control of Kiev and the rest of the state.

At this point, Russia is not interested in the dividing of Ukraine. First of all because of the fear that some parts which would not remain in the pro-Russian Ukraine will serve as the basis of a NATO member state, with all that entails. During the next few days, there may be a Russian takeover of nuclear power plants in Ukraine (there are two) in order to prevent acts of sabotage that could cause a nuclear disaster “Chernobyl-style”, or even worst, and takeover of strategic points and missile and naval bases.

Special attention will be given to the airports in Ukraine, especially the main ones, those which the Russian army could control, both for the benefit of its operations and to prevent reinforcements shipments flown to Ukraine. The South-Eastern regions, where most of Ukraine’s industry is concentrated, may stop the transfer of goods and money to other areas of Ukraine and Kiev, and by that exacerbate the economic and financial condition. Russia may in return increase the economic aid to those areas.

On the other side stands the Ukraine army. This army is weak. A substantial share of it has been acquiring hostile feelings towards the regime in Kiev. Perhaps, a part of it will support the government in Kiev, while the other part will support its opponents in the South-Eastern regions. In any case, the units which will support the pro-Russian forces will receive the support of the Russians and their army. The units which will stand against and try to exert power might be attacked by the Russian army.

Transfer of forces to Crimea, assignment of soldiers on the border and encouragement of pro-Russian demonstrations. Yakov (Yasha) Kedmi outlines the moves of the Russian President in the struggle for the future of Ukraine

Russia sees in the current events in Ukraine “intervention and a subversive action of the US and Europe” for change of regime through use of force, and an overthrow of a legitimate regime, which was democratically elected.

Putin did not meet with the deposed President Yanukovych, and neither he nor anyone of the Russian leadership has declared any support in the ousted president. Also there was not an official statement of recognition or non-recognition of the new regime. Statements were made only on the seizure of power through brutal violence and on the involvement of radical nationalists and fascist elements.

According to the Russian perception, in Ukraine today there is no central government and the state is dominated with governmental anarchy and lack of stability and security to its citizens. According to Russia’s security doctrine, non-stability of neighboring countries is a threat to the Russian security. Moreover, Russia sees what is happening in Ukraine as a conspiracy planned by the US and NATO, in its ultimate goal to make Ukraine a NATO member state within a certain time.

The expansion of NATO eastward, towards Ukraine, at the risk of placing NATO bases in the territory of Ukraine, first ands foremost missile bases, is preserved by Russia as an existential threat. Apparently, some kind of a Putin Doctrine was expected in Russia, which means zero concessions to the West and the US in their attempt to expand their influence in the territory of the former Soviet Union.

The first indication of the existence of such a doctrine was the war with Georgia. Russia also does not rely on negotiations and agreements with Europe and the US, following the failed attempt of agreement in Libya, and the latest agreement in Ukraine, with guarantees signed by European foreign ministers, violated several hours after it was signed.

Russia decided to openly intervene in Ukraine and to outweigh by itself the governmental status of Ukraine according to its interests. The first step is putting troops in Crimea. About six thousand soldiers were moved into Crimea using the Russian Navy. 10 cargo aircraft were as well positioned in Crimea, 10 fighter jets and 30 APCs (armored personnel carriers). This indicates that Crimea may be a military base for a quick movement of forces to other regions of Ukraine.

In the South-Eastern regions of Ukraine, with considerable Russian population such as Crimea, a local government stabilization process against the Kiev authorities has begun, with a request for assistance from Russia. It is possible that these areas will be inserted with Russian troops as well. In any case those areas began establishing local forces on the basis of military personnel, police and local volunteers, assisted by the Russian army. It is possible, upon completion of the construction of these units, they will begin to move towards other regions of Ukraine to take control of Kiev and the rest of the state.

At this point, Russia is not interested in the dividing of Ukraine. First of all because of the fear that some parts which would not remain in the pro-Russian Ukraine will serve as the basis of a NATO member state, with all that entails. During the next few days, there may be a Russian takeover of nuclear power plants in Ukraine (there are two) in order to prevent acts of sabotage that could cause a nuclear disaster “Chernobyl-style”, or even worst, and takeover of strategic points and missile and naval bases.

Special attention will be given to the airports in Ukraine, especially the main ones, those which the Russian army could control, both for the benefit of its operations and to prevent reinforcements shipments flown to Ukraine. The South-Eastern regions, where most of Ukraine’s industry is concentrated, may stop the transfer of goods and money to other areas of Ukraine and Kiev, and by that exacerbate the economic and financial condition. Russia may in return increase the economic aid to those areas.

On the other side stands the Ukraine army. This army is weak. A substantial share of it has been acquiring hostile feelings towards the regime in Kiev. Perhaps, a part of it will support the government in Kiev, while the other part will support its opponents in the South-Eastern regions. In any case, the units which will support the pro-Russian forces will receive the support of the Russians and their army. The units which will stand against and try to exert power might be attacked by the Russian army.

Law Introduced To Duma Enabling Fast Annexation Of Territories In Crisis

Ukraine crisis: Russia mulls new land-grab law

BBC

Pro-Russian protest in Crimea, 27 Feb 14 Ethnic Russians in Crimea reject the new pro-Western leaders in Ukraine’s capital Kiev

Russian MPs have proposed new laws that would make it easier for Russia to incorporate parts of Ukraine, and allow Russian citizenship to be fast-tracked.

Pro-Kremlin party A Just Russia put forward both bills, and linked them directly to the situation in Ukraine.

Separatist and pro-Russian feelings are strong in Ukraine’s Crimea region, which is now the focus of the crisis.

Russian MPs say a referendum or a plea from a territory’s leaders would be enough to trigger the new provisions.

There are already many Russian citizens in Crimea.

In Sevastopol, base of the Russian Black Sea Fleet, a majority hold Russian passports.

Under Russia’s existing law, a neighbouring state would have to sign a treaty with Russia to allow part of its territory to become a new “subject” of the Russian Federation.

But Mikhail Yemelyanov, deputy leader of A Just Russia, said the law had been drafted for peaceful times, and did not go far enough for situations where a state was falling apart.

“In conditions where a neighbouring state is disintegrating I don’t think the Russian Federation should be restricted in its ability to accept a territory whose people have expressed a clear will and desire to be in Russia,” he said.

Map of the Crimean peninsula

Since Russia’s war with Georgia in 2008, the breakaway Georgian territories of Abkhazia and South Ossetia have come under Moscow’s control.

Russia poured troops into both regions to help pro-Russian separatists who did not recognise Georgia’s authority.

The other bill to be considered by the Duma – Russia’s lower house – would speed up the procedures for issuing Russian passports.

Passport applicants would not have to pay a state tax, and previous residence in Russia would no longer be required.

In addition, they would not have to have sufficient funds to support themselves and would not have to give up their Ukrainian citizenship.

‘Fascist threat’

The bill’s preamble says it is aimed “at supporting the fraternal people of Ukraine, especially the Russian-speaking ones, who are defenceless in the face of the ‘brown threat’,” a reference to World War Two fascists who wore brown uniforms.

The bill would allow Ukrainians to apply for Russian passports at Russian diplomatic missions before 1 August, and they could become citizens after two months, instead of waiting a year, as is currently the norm.

The plan to have a new fast-track procedure for issuing Russian passports was announced in Sevastopol on Thursday by A Just Russia leader Sergei Mironov.

Several Russian MPs have also gone to Crimea, including Russian celebrities – former Olympic ice skating champion Irina Rodnina, former cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova and heavyweight boxer Nikolai Valuev.