Why Is World War II Being Rekindled in Ukraine?

Why There Will Be War in Ukraine

Moscow Times

The current crisis is not about Crimea. It is about the rights of Russian-speakers throughout Ukraine whom the Kremlin wants to protect from violence and discrimination. Russia does not want a military intervention in Crimea and does not want to take Crimea from Ukraine.

There is a political solution to this crisis. First, create a coalition government in Kiev composed of all parties, including those from the east and south of the country. The current government is dominated by anti-Russian extremists from western Ukraine.

If the extremists who seized power in Kiev do not accept Russia’s democratic proposals, Russia will likely be forced to revert to military means to solve the crisis in Ukraine.

Second, Ukraine needs to draft a democratic constitution that has guarantees for Ukraine’s Russian-speaking population that would grant official status to the Russian language and establish the principle of federalism.

Third, presidential and parliamentary elections must be held soon. Independent election observers must play an active role in ensuring that the elections are free and fair. There is a real danger that they will be manipulated by the neo-Nazi militants who de facto seized power in a coup.

If these democratic and peaceful solutions to the crisis in Ukraine are rejected by the opposition forces that have seized power in Kiev, I am afraid that Russia will have no other choice but to revert to military means. If the junta leaders want to avoid war, they need to adopt Moscow’s peaceful and democratic proposals and adhere to them.

Those currently in power in Kiev are carrying out a political strategy that is not so much pro-European as it is anti-Russian, as evidenced by the surprisingly heavy-handed tactics the U.S. and European Union  have employed in Ukraine. In the end, a minority executed a violent coup that removed the democratically elected and legitimate president of Ukraine.

The Kremlin believes that the current Ukrainian leadership will manipulate the elections planned for May 25 to install a single leader or coalition government functioning much as former Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili did in Tbilisi. A “Ukrainian Saakashvili” will unleash an even more repressive campaign of intimidation against Russian-speakers, one that over several years would stoke anti-Russia hysteria among the general population.

After that, Kiev may evict Russia’s Black Sea Fleet from Sevastopol and purge Crimea of any Russian influence. Ukraine could easily become a radicalized, anti-Russian state, at which point Kiev will fabricate a pretext to justify taking subversive action against Moscow. This looks especially likely considering that ruling coalition members from the neo-fascist Svoboda and Right Sector parties have already made territorial claims against Russia. They could easily send their army of activists to Russia to join local separatists and foment rebellion in the North Caucasus and other unstable regions in Russia. In addition, Russia’s opposition movement will surely want to use the successful experience and technology of the Euromaidan protests and, with the help and financial support of the West, try to carry out their own revolution in Moscow. The goal: to remove President Vladimir Putin from power and install a puppet leadership that will sell Russia’s strategic interests out to the West in the same way former President Boris Yeltsin did in the 1990s.

The official census puts the Russian minority in Ukraine at 16 percent of the total population, although that number was falsified. The actual number is closer to 25 percent. Surveys indicate that 45 percent of the country’s population speak Russian at home, 45 percent speak Ukrainian and 10 percent speak both languages. In the most recent Gallup survey, when asked in which language they would like to be polled, 83 percent of respondents chose Russian. Taking into account the rural population in western and central Ukraine, about 75 percent of the people, probably speak Russian. Of that 75 percent, only about 10 percent are those in Kiev and a few other major cities who supported the protests. This means that only 35 percent of the population are attempting to impose its will on the remaining 65 percent, using a violent coup to achieve their goals.

Putin made the right decision: He did not to wait for that attack and took preventative measures. Many in the West say the Kremlin’s reactions were paranoiac, but Germany’s Jews also thought the same of leaving the country in 1934. Most of them chose to believe they were safe and remained in Germany even after Hitler came to power. The infamous Kristallnacht took place five years later, one of the first early chapters in the “Final Solution.” Similarly, just four years remain until Russia’s presidential election in 2018, and there is a strong risk that subversive forces within and outside Russia will try to overthrow Putin, in part using their new foothold in Ukraine.

Will there be war in Ukraine? I am afraid so. After all, the extremists who seized power in Kiev want to see a bloodbath. Only fear for their own lives might stop them from inciting such a conflict. Russia is prepared to move its forces into southern and eastern Ukraine if repressive measures are used against the Russian-speaking population or if a military intervention occurs. Russia will not annex Crimea. It has enough territory already. At the same time, however, it will also not stand by passively while Russophobic and neo-Nazi gangs hold the people of Crimea, Kharkiv and Donetsk at their mercy.

Sergei Markov is director of the Institute of Political Studies.

En Masse, Ukrainian Soldiers Swear Allegiance To Crimean Govt

Ukrainian Army servicemen en masse pledging allegiance to new Crimean government

itar tass

“Everyone who doesn’t obey will be held accountable to the full extent of the law”, – Prime Minister Sergei Aksyonov underlined
EPA/MAXIM SHIPENKOV

SIMFEROPOL, ITAR-TASS

Ukrainian Army men and officers deployed in the Crimea are en masse pledging allegiance with the new legitimately elected authorities of the Autonomous Republic, Prime Minister Sergei Aksyonov said in an address Sunday night.

“I am thankful to them for their patriotism, since the military as a special category of people – they have a particularly keen understanding of the dangers of combat operations and I feel confident that they will do everything in their power to prevent bloodshed and to cool off the mischief-making politicians who have taken over Kiev,” he said.

“The military don’t want to be speechless tools in the hands of followers of (Stepan) Bandera (the chieftain of far-right militant Ukrainian nationalist during World War II – Itar-Tass) and won’t take on that role,” Aksyonov said.

“I’d like to warn the commanding officers who might be pushing their soldiers towards wrongful acts that measures envisioned by law will be taken against them,” he said. “Everyone who doesn’t obey will be held accountable to the full extent of the law.

Putin Doctrine in Action

Transfer of forces to Crimea, assignment of soldiers on the border and encouragement of pro-Russian demonstrations. Yakov (Yasha) Kedmi outlines the moves of the Russian President in the struggle for the future of Ukraine

Russia sees in the current events in Ukraine “intervention and a subversive action of the US and Europe” for change of regime through use of force, and an overthrow of a legitimate regime, which was democratically elected.

Putin did not meet with the deposed President Yanukovych, and neither he nor anyone of the Russian leadership has declared any support in the ousted president. Also there was not an official statement of recognition or non-recognition of the new regime. Statements were made only on the seizure of power through brutal violence and on the involvement of radical nationalists and fascist elements.

According to the Russian perception, in Ukraine today there is no central government and the state is dominated with governmental anarchy and lack of stability and security to its citizens. According to Russia’s security doctrine, non-stability of neighboring countries is a threat to the Russian security. Moreover, Russia sees what is happening in Ukraine as a conspiracy planned by the US and NATO, in its ultimate goal to make Ukraine a NATO member state within a certain time.

The expansion of NATO eastward, towards Ukraine, at the risk of placing NATO bases in the territory of Ukraine, first ands foremost missile bases, is preserved by Russia as an existential threat. Apparently, some kind of a Putin Doctrine was expected in Russia, which means zero concessions to the West and the US in their attempt to expand their influence in the territory of the former Soviet Union.

The first indication of the existence of such a doctrine was the war with Georgia. Russia also does not rely on negotiations and agreements with Europe and the US, following the failed attempt of agreement in Libya, and the latest agreement in Ukraine, with guarantees signed by European foreign ministers, violated several hours after it was signed.

Russia decided to openly intervene in Ukraine and to outweigh by itself the governmental status of Ukraine according to its interests. The first step is putting troops in Crimea. About six thousand soldiers were moved into Crimea using the Russian Navy. 10 cargo aircraft were as well positioned in Crimea, 10 fighter jets and 30 APCs (armored personnel carriers). This indicates that Crimea may be a military base for a quick movement of forces to other regions of Ukraine.

In the South-Eastern regions of Ukraine, with considerable Russian population such as Crimea, a local government stabilization process against the Kiev authorities has begun, with a request for assistance from Russia. It is possible that these areas will be inserted with Russian troops as well. In any case those areas began establishing local forces on the basis of military personnel, police and local volunteers, assisted by the Russian army. It is possible, upon completion of the construction of these units, they will begin to move towards other regions of Ukraine to take control of Kiev and the rest of the state.

At this point, Russia is not interested in the dividing of Ukraine. First of all because of the fear that some parts which would not remain in the pro-Russian Ukraine will serve as the basis of a NATO member state, with all that entails. During the next few days, there may be a Russian takeover of nuclear power plants in Ukraine (there are two) in order to prevent acts of sabotage that could cause a nuclear disaster “Chernobyl-style”, or even worst, and takeover of strategic points and missile and naval bases.

Special attention will be given to the airports in Ukraine, especially the main ones, those which the Russian army could control, both for the benefit of its operations and to prevent reinforcements shipments flown to Ukraine. The South-Eastern regions, where most of Ukraine’s industry is concentrated, may stop the transfer of goods and money to other areas of Ukraine and Kiev, and by that exacerbate the economic and financial condition. Russia may in return increase the economic aid to those areas.

On the other side stands the Ukraine army. This army is weak. A substantial share of it has been acquiring hostile feelings towards the regime in Kiev. Perhaps, a part of it will support the government in Kiev, while the other part will support its opponents in the South-Eastern regions. In any case, the units which will support the pro-Russian forces will receive the support of the Russians and their army. The units which will stand against and try to exert power might be attacked by the Russian army.

Transfer of forces to Crimea, assignment of soldiers on the border and encouragement of pro-Russian demonstrations. Yakov (Yasha) Kedmi outlines the moves of the Russian President in the struggle for the future of Ukraine

Russia sees in the current events in Ukraine “intervention and a subversive action of the US and Europe” for change of regime through use of force, and an overthrow of a legitimate regime, which was democratically elected.

Putin did not meet with the deposed President Yanukovych, and neither he nor anyone of the Russian leadership has declared any support in the ousted president. Also there was not an official statement of recognition or non-recognition of the new regime. Statements were made only on the seizure of power through brutal violence and on the involvement of radical nationalists and fascist elements.

According to the Russian perception, in Ukraine today there is no central government and the state is dominated with governmental anarchy and lack of stability and security to its citizens. According to Russia’s security doctrine, non-stability of neighboring countries is a threat to the Russian security. Moreover, Russia sees what is happening in Ukraine as a conspiracy planned by the US and NATO, in its ultimate goal to make Ukraine a NATO member state within a certain time.

The expansion of NATO eastward, towards Ukraine, at the risk of placing NATO bases in the territory of Ukraine, first ands foremost missile bases, is preserved by Russia as an existential threat. Apparently, some kind of a Putin Doctrine was expected in Russia, which means zero concessions to the West and the US in their attempt to expand their influence in the territory of the former Soviet Union.

The first indication of the existence of such a doctrine was the war with Georgia. Russia also does not rely on negotiations and agreements with Europe and the US, following the failed attempt of agreement in Libya, and the latest agreement in Ukraine, with guarantees signed by European foreign ministers, violated several hours after it was signed.

Russia decided to openly intervene in Ukraine and to outweigh by itself the governmental status of Ukraine according to its interests. The first step is putting troops in Crimea. About six thousand soldiers were moved into Crimea using the Russian Navy. 10 cargo aircraft were as well positioned in Crimea, 10 fighter jets and 30 APCs (armored personnel carriers). This indicates that Crimea may be a military base for a quick movement of forces to other regions of Ukraine.

In the South-Eastern regions of Ukraine, with considerable Russian population such as Crimea, a local government stabilization process against the Kiev authorities has begun, with a request for assistance from Russia. It is possible that these areas will be inserted with Russian troops as well. In any case those areas began establishing local forces on the basis of military personnel, police and local volunteers, assisted by the Russian army. It is possible, upon completion of the construction of these units, they will begin to move towards other regions of Ukraine to take control of Kiev and the rest of the state.

At this point, Russia is not interested in the dividing of Ukraine. First of all because of the fear that some parts which would not remain in the pro-Russian Ukraine will serve as the basis of a NATO member state, with all that entails. During the next few days, there may be a Russian takeover of nuclear power plants in Ukraine (there are two) in order to prevent acts of sabotage that could cause a nuclear disaster “Chernobyl-style”, or even worst, and takeover of strategic points and missile and naval bases.

Special attention will be given to the airports in Ukraine, especially the main ones, those which the Russian army could control, both for the benefit of its operations and to prevent reinforcements shipments flown to Ukraine. The South-Eastern regions, where most of Ukraine’s industry is concentrated, may stop the transfer of goods and money to other areas of Ukraine and Kiev, and by that exacerbate the economic and financial condition. Russia may in return increase the economic aid to those areas.

On the other side stands the Ukraine army. This army is weak. A substantial share of it has been acquiring hostile feelings towards the regime in Kiev. Perhaps, a part of it will support the government in Kiev, while the other part will support its opponents in the South-Eastern regions. In any case, the units which will support the pro-Russian forces will receive the support of the Russians and their army. The units which will stand against and try to exert power might be attacked by the Russian army.

Law Introduced To Duma Enabling Fast Annexation Of Territories In Crisis

Ukraine crisis: Russia mulls new land-grab law

BBC

Pro-Russian protest in Crimea, 27 Feb 14 Ethnic Russians in Crimea reject the new pro-Western leaders in Ukraine’s capital Kiev

Russian MPs have proposed new laws that would make it easier for Russia to incorporate parts of Ukraine, and allow Russian citizenship to be fast-tracked.

Pro-Kremlin party A Just Russia put forward both bills, and linked them directly to the situation in Ukraine.

Separatist and pro-Russian feelings are strong in Ukraine’s Crimea region, which is now the focus of the crisis.

Russian MPs say a referendum or a plea from a territory’s leaders would be enough to trigger the new provisions.

There are already many Russian citizens in Crimea.

In Sevastopol, base of the Russian Black Sea Fleet, a majority hold Russian passports.

Under Russia’s existing law, a neighbouring state would have to sign a treaty with Russia to allow part of its territory to become a new “subject” of the Russian Federation.

But Mikhail Yemelyanov, deputy leader of A Just Russia, said the law had been drafted for peaceful times, and did not go far enough for situations where a state was falling apart.

“In conditions where a neighbouring state is disintegrating I don’t think the Russian Federation should be restricted in its ability to accept a territory whose people have expressed a clear will and desire to be in Russia,” he said.

Map of the Crimean peninsula

Since Russia’s war with Georgia in 2008, the breakaway Georgian territories of Abkhazia and South Ossetia have come under Moscow’s control.

Russia poured troops into both regions to help pro-Russian separatists who did not recognise Georgia’s authority.

The other bill to be considered by the Duma – Russia’s lower house – would speed up the procedures for issuing Russian passports.

Passport applicants would not have to pay a state tax, and previous residence in Russia would no longer be required.

In addition, they would not have to have sufficient funds to support themselves and would not have to give up their Ukrainian citizenship.

‘Fascist threat’

The bill’s preamble says it is aimed “at supporting the fraternal people of Ukraine, especially the Russian-speaking ones, who are defenceless in the face of the ‘brown threat’,” a reference to World War Two fascists who wore brown uniforms.

The bill would allow Ukrainians to apply for Russian passports at Russian diplomatic missions before 1 August, and they could become citizens after two months, instead of waiting a year, as is currently the norm.

The plan to have a new fast-track procedure for issuing Russian passports was announced in Sevastopol on Thursday by A Just Russia leader Sergei Mironov.

Several Russian MPs have also gone to Crimea, including Russian celebrities – former Olympic ice skating champion Irina Rodnina, former cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova and heavyweight boxer Nikolai Valuev.

New Ukrainian Boss Warns Russian Troops To Remain In Their Barracks

[SEE:  Armed men seize government HQ, raise Russian flag in Ukraine's Crimea]

Ukraine Warns Russia on Troop Movements

kyiv post

The interim president of Ukraine Oleksandr Turchynov

The interim president of Ukraine Oleksandr Turchynov     © RIA Novosti. Andrey Stenin

KIEV, February 27 (RIA Novosti) – The interim president of Ukraine warned Thursday that any movement by Russian forces outside their bases in the southern republic of Crimea will be interpreted as an act of military aggression.

Already frayed nerves on the peninsula reached breaking point after armed gunmen occupied the parliament Thursday in the Crimean town of Simferopol, only one day after fistfights erupted outside the building between supporters and opponents of the country’s incoming leadership.

Russia, which has a substantial military presence at its leased naval base in the Ukrainian Black Sea city of Sevastopol, has insisted it will not interfere in its neighbor’s affairs, while at the same time voicing worries about possible discrimination against ethnic Russians in the country.

About half of Crimea’s population identifies as ethnic Russian.

Interim President Oleksandr Turchynov appealed to Russian Black Sea servicemen to refrain from leaving their quarters, apparently echoing wider international concern that Moscow may choose to throw its weight behind pro-Russian groups in Crimea seeking to defy authorities in Kiev.

“Any movement, particularly with weapons, outside official residences regulated by our agreement will be interpreted by us as military aggression,” Turchynov said.

Russia maintains thousands of military personnel at bases in Sevastopol that it rents from Ukraine.

Russian President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday ordered snap military exercises in Russia’s western regions, including those bordering Ukraine.

Eyewitnesses in central Sevastopol reported seeing Russian armored personnel carriers on Tuesday and there have been other unconfirmed reports of Russian troop movements around the city since the weekend.

Acting Ukrainian Interior Minister Arsen Avakov posted a link Thursday to an article on a Ukrainian news site reporting on a column of Russian APCs heading for Simferopol on a planned exercise being turned back by local law enforcement authorities.

In recent days, a series of pro-Russian demonstrations have taken place across Crimea. Protesters have said at those gatherings that they do not recognize the current government in Kiev and have called for Russian intervention.

Demonstrators raise Russian flag in Kerch

 

 

 

Demonstrators raise Russian flag in KerchPicture: AFP

Kerch. Demonstrators raised a Russian flag onto a pylon of the city hall in Kerch, which is a city on the Kerch Peninsula of eastern Crimea, UNIAN reported.
A protest rally was staged in Kerch by people who oppose EU association. The protesters were carrying flags of the Russian Unity party and others. They were also carrying posters which read ”Shameful intervention” and ”Crimea wants peace”.
The protesters started chanting ”Kerch-Crimea, we want [to be] in Russia” in front of the city hall. The Mayor tried to subdue them without success. Clashes followed.
The demonstrators took down the national flag of Ukraine, which was fastened to a pylon, and raised the flags of Russia and the Autonomous Republic of Crimea.

© 2014 All rights reserved. Citing Focus Information Agency is mandatory!

Putin Visits With Leaders Manning Next Line of Defense In Western Psywar

[Considering the Ukrainian factor and the urgency of the hour, we can safely assume that Putin's first important meetings after the close of the Olympic pageantry would be those national leaders manning the next line of defenses between Ukraine and Russia.  The following comes from the website of the President of Russia.  I have added links below to the national challenges currently confronting each of Putin's visitors (excluding the Korean reps).  After Ukraine, it is reasonable to question whether the Russian military will do anything to prevent the next attack, or simply wait until Russia itself is invaded.

The ongoing US State Dept/CIA blitzkrieg across Europe is just as atrocious and immoral as Hitler's blitz, even though ours is being committed under the disguise of "humanitarianism." 

All of our leaders are evil men.]

Vladimir Putin held a number of bilateral meetings

president of russia

February 23, 2014,

41d4c28c8e8795ee9249
Photo: the Presidential Press and Information Office Before the closing ceremony of the XXII 2014 Winter Olympics. With President of Bulgaria Rosen Plevneliev. February 23, 2014—(SEE: Bulgarian Nationalists Stage Rally  U.S. to Train Libyan Military Personnel in Bulgaria)
41d4c28c9fec404ac1bb
Photo: the Presidential Press and Information Office Before the closing ceremony of the XXII 2014 Winter Olympics. With Serbian Prime Minister Ivica Dacic.February 23, 2014—(SEE:  Colour revolution unleashed in Bosnia)
41d4c28f3cf087fd1505
Photo: the Presidential Press and Information Office Before the closing ceremony of the XXII 2014 Winter Olympics. With Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev and Prime Minister of Armenia Tigran Sargsyan.February 23, 2014—(SEE:  Protesters Say ‘No To The USSR’ As Putin Woos Armenia)

Before the closing ceremony of the XXII 2014 Winter Olympics, Mr Putin spoke with President of the International Olympic Committee Thomas Bach. The President and Mr Bach congratulated each other on the successful hosting of the Sochi Olympics.

Mr Putin also spoke with President of Bulgaria Rosen Plevneliev, Prime Minister of Serbia Ivica Dacic, Prime Minister of Armenia Tigran Sargsyan, Prime Minister of the Republic of Korea Chung Hong-won, and President of the PyeongChang 2018 Organising Committee Kim Jin-sun.