Reagan’s “Star Wars” Missile Defense System Is Still A Bad Joke–On Obama

 

[Hitting a bullet with another bullet is only possible in a lab, or in science fiction:

"Like trying to hit a bullet with a smaller bullet whilst wearing a blindfold, riding a horse."---Commander Montgomery Scott ("Scotty"), Star Trek]

US missile defense test fails: Pentagon

News Asia

America’s missile defense system failed on Friday in a test over the Pacific, with an interceptor failing to hit an incoming ballistic missile, the Pentagon said.

[Despite Pentagon bragging about the Navy's SM-3 Aegis system shoot-down of an expired satellite, there has never been a successful test of any of these systems on a ballistic missile in the past 30 years, yet Obama insists on pushing the world to the brink based on the great lie that we have, or are about to have a reliable ABM system which does not rely on nuclear-armed anti-ballistic missiles.]

“The Pentagon suffered another humiliating failure in the latest test of its troubled national missile defense system when a prototype rocket missed its target over the Pacific Ocean Tuesday night.

It was another in a string of largely unsuccessful tests.”January 20, 2000

WASHINGTON: America’s missile defense system failed on Friday in a test over the Pacific, with an interceptor failing to hit an incoming ballistic missile, the Pentagon said.

The miss represented yet another setback for the costly ground-based interceptors, which have not had a successful test result since 2008.

The test’s objective was to have an interceptor, launched from Vandenberg air base in California, knock out a long-range ballistic missile fired from a US military test site at Kwajalein atoll in the Marshall Islands.

But “an intercept was not achieved,” US Missile Defense Agency spokesman Richard Lehner said in a brief statement.

“Program officials will conduct an extensive review to determine the cause or causes of any anomalies which may have prevented a successful intercept,” it said.

The anti-missile weapon has run into repeated technical problems, with tests delayed after two failures in 2010.

The United States has 30 of the ground-based interceptors in Alaska and California, at a cost of about $34 billion. They are supposed to counter the potential threat posed by North Korea, which has tried to develop long-range ballistic missiles.

The Pentagon wants to deploy an additional 14 ground-based interceptors to bases in Alaska, at a cost of about $1 billion, also in response to what Washington deems a growing threat from North Korea.

Some lawmakers also are pushing to open a new missile defense site on the country’s East Coast, in case Iran or other adversaries obtain long-range missiles.

Critics of the missile defense program are sure to seize on the test result as further proof that the system faces insurmountable technical hurdles.

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