France–“Our friend Qatar is financing Mali’s Islamists”

Qatar — where Arab supremacism, for which islam is a vehicle, becomes old-fashioned economic imperialism:

Qatar wants to see a return on its (Islamic) investment:

“Qatar has an established a network of institutions it funds in Mali, including madrasses (religious schools), schools and charities that it has been funding from the 1980s,”

France launches unprecedented campaign against Qatar role in Mali

Leader of Socialist Party in France slams ‘form of indulgence” from Qatar ‘towards terrorist groups who occupied northern Mali’, asking Emirate for ‘policy clarification’.

PARIS – The Leader of the ruling Socialist Party in France, Harlem Desir, slammed on Sunday “a form of indulgence” from Qatar “towards the terrorist groups who occupied northern Mali,” asking the Gulf Emirate for a “policy clarification “.

Desir noted that “political statements of a number of Qatari officials had challenged the French intervention” in Mali.

“There is an attitude that is not cooperative and that can be considered as a form of leniency towards the terrorist groups who occupied northern Mali. This attitude coming from Qatar is not normal,” added Desire at a weekly political programme on one of the Jewish community radio in France, Radio J.

We need a policy clarification from Qatar who has always denied any role in funding terrorist groups. On the diplomatic level, Qatar should adopt a much stronger, and firmer position towards these groups who threaten the security of the Sahel region,” added Desir.France Now Criticizes Qatar For Its Role In Mali

 Related:

Islamic Jihadists are poodles for wealthy Gulf elites and Pakistan–Qatar, Saudi Arabia and terrorism

Islamic Jihadists are poodles for wealthy Gulf elites and Pakistan: Qatar, Saudi Arabia and terrorism

 

modern tokyo timesMODERN TOKYO TIMES

 

Islamic Jihadists are poodles for wealthy Gulf elites and Pakistan: Qatar, Saudi Arabia and terrorism

 

Murad Makhmudov and Lee Jay Walker

 

Modern Tokyo Times

 

jihadists

 

Al-Qaeda affiliates and a plethora of Sunni Islamic jihadist movements in Syria are highlighting the ultra-reactionary reality that exists wherever jihadists are based because of sinister forces throughout the Gulf region. In the Gulf you have certain families and individuals with enormous wealth and who purchase the most expensive things that you can find on this planet. At the same time, these feudal Gulf nation states seek to preserve their feudal power bases at all costs. Therefore, Gulf petrodollars are investing heavily on spreading Salafi Islam; supporting reactionary Sunni Takfiri clerics who spread sectarianism based on their anti-Shia agenda; forcing women into the shadows; and garnering financial support for terrorist movements – and other negative realities.

 

Of course, it doesn’t concern al-Qaeda affiliates and other Sunni Islamist movements that feudal monarchs spend vast sums on enormous palaces, buy sublime yachts, invest in football clubs, and so forth; no, issues related to social justice doesn’t even enter the equation. Therefore, while Sunni terrorist reactionary forces blight parts of Egypt, Iraq, Nigeria, Pakistan, Somalia, Syria, Yemen and other countries – it is clear that wealthy Gulf monarchs don’t fear a threat to their respective power bases by the very same terrorist groups. Obviously, this isn’t surprising because the main source of funding terrorism and sectarianism in many parts of the world emanates directly from the Gulf region irrespective if state sanctioned; based on Sunni Islamist Salafi organizations; funded by extremely wealthy individuals; ratlines within the banking sector; or based on powerful charities which hide behind slick advertisements based on media propaganda.

 

In other words, religious militancy in the Gulf is the perfect ticket to spread compliant Salafi and Takfiri Islam based on brainwashing individuals into supporting a monoculture based on “year zero.” These ultra reactionary forces can be manipulated easily by inciting hatred towards “the other” based on rhetoric related to jihad, Sharia and oppressing all moderate forces. Therefore, Kurdish Islamists are killing fellow Kurds; Syrian Islamist sectarians are killing fellow Syrians; Islamists in the Sinai are killing fellow Egyptians; and it goes on and on. Indeed, in Bangladesh it is clear that Islamist militant forces even fought against their own people and committed mass atrocities for Pakistan while the people of this country were fighting for independence. This reality highlights the fact that Islamic jihadists are mere fodder for wealthy Gulf monarchs, the intrigues of Western powers (CIA and MI6 supported jihadists in Afghanistan, Bosnia, Libya and so forth), the policies of Pakistan and so forth.

 

In Pakistan this nation helped Islamic jihadists from all over the world to fight in Afghanistan in the 1980s and early 1990s in cohorts with America, the United Kingdom, Saudi Arabia and other Gulf powers. The same Pakistan allied itself with Bangladesh Islamist movements in order to try to crush the independence of this nation. Likewise, Islamist militancy in Kashmir is based on the intrigues of Pakistan and several major terrorist attacks in India relate to Pakistan and the ISI.

 

Turning the clock forward to 2013 and even now Pakistan is playing a dangerous game whereby the ISI and other intrigues in this nation are enabling militant Sunni Islamist forces to have a foothold aimed at Afghanistan and India. Therefore, the Shia and other religious minorities suffer enormous persecution because Sunni Islamist militant forces are allowed to flourish in this country. Indeed, even Pakistan soldiers are fodder to the elites in this nation because many known terrorists mingle freely in parts of this country. The killing of Osama bin Laden highlights the double-game that Pakistan is playing and the same applies to the recent killing of Nasiruddin Haqqani in Islamabad. After all, both individuals were not afraid of authorities in Pakistan.

 

Therefore, in Pakistan it is clear that Sunni Islamic jihadists remain to be a fixture within the geopolitical ambitions of this nation. After all, Pakistan can’t defeat the military of India based on past conflicts that erupted between both nations. However, Kashmir can be taken by stealth by Pakistan based on spreading Islamic militancy and indoctrinating the people of Kashmir. Hindus therefore have fled many areas of Kashmir despite residing in India. Also, indigenous Sunni Islam in this part of India is being transformed by Gulf versions of Islam and the militant message of Takfiris in Pakistan.

 

Takfiris and militant Salafists in nations like Iraq, Pakistan, Somalia and Syria adore beheading, blowing up people, destroying the economy of nations they are based in, infringing on the rights of non-Muslims, persecuting the Shia, shackling women and other draconian realities. Overwhelmingly, these militant Sunni fanatics are mainly slaughtering Muslims and destroying Muslim dominated nation states. Nothing is productive and now from Afghanistan to Nigeria in West Africa you have an enormous belt of chaos, daily massacres and destabilized nation states. These ultra reactionaries are a mirror to the reality of modern day Saudi Arabia whereby all non-Muslim faiths are banned, the Shia are persecuted, women are forced to cover-up and marrying little girls is legal based on Sharia Islamic law.

 

Of course, wealthy elites in the Gulf invest in major fashion houses, buy property all over the world, travel first class, invest in powerful football teams and enjoy a life which is completely free from the shackles that they enforce on society. Despite this, modern day al-Qaeda affiliates and radical Salafi and Takfiri forces ignore this reality because they are doing the bidding of the same wealthy Gulf elites. Therefore, wealthy feudal monarchy states are not threatened by “year zero Sunni Islamists” but in Pakistan the situation isn’t so clear because draconian forces are also based internally.

 

leejay@moderntokyotimes.com

 

http://moderntokyotimes.com

Hold Qatar Responsible for “Islamist/Wahhabi” Rebellion In Africa

[While we still can, the Free World should literally ROAST THE FAT PIG OF QATAR.]

[SEE: France: “Our friend Qatar is financing Mali’s Islamists”  ;  France launches unprecedented campaign against Qatar role in Mali ]

Central African Republic ‘descending into chaos’ – UN

BBC

The BBC’s Laeila Adjovi reports from Bossangoa, where Christians have fled their homes

The Central African Republic (CAR) is descending into “complete chaos”, the UN deputy secretary general has warned, calling for urgent action.

Jan Eliasson urged the Security Council to strengthen the African Union-led force in the country, and to turn it into a UN peacekeeping operation.

The CAR has been in turmoil since rebels seized power in March, with warnings of a possible genocide.

France has said it would contribute about 1,000 troops to the force.

Senior UN and French officials have warned that a cycle of violence between the Muslim minority, now in power, and the Christian majority could become a genocide.

It is not known how many people have been killed in the conflict this year because it is too dangerous to access the rural areas where most killings occur, a UN spokeswoman told the BBC.

However, she said that in the Bossangoa area alone, one of the worst-hit areas about 300km (185 miles) north of the capital, Bangui, several hundred people had been killed in the first two weeks of September.

Some 460,000 people – 10% of the population of 4.6 million – have fled their homes, while more than a million need food aid, according to the United Nations.

Tens of thousands have sought refuge at the Catholic mission in Bossangoa.

The priest in charge, Frederic Tonfio, told the BBC: “The tension here is palpable. People are absolutely terrified.”

‘Regional threat’

Mr Eliasson said there had been an surge in sexual violence, torture, summary executions and sectarian violence.

“The CAR is becoming a breeding ground for extremists and armed groups in a region that is already suffering from conflict and instability,” he said.

“If this situation is left to fester, it may develop into a religious and ethnic conflict with long-standing consequences, even a civil war that could spread into neighbouring countries.”

Some of CAR’s neighbours such as South Sudan, the Sudanese region of Darfur, Chad and the Democratic Republic of Congo are trying to emerge from years of conflict and remain extremely unstable.

Map showing the location of the Central African Republic and the countries that border it

France, the former colonial power, currently has about 400 soldiers stationed in Bangui. Their mission is to protect French nationals.

On Tuesday, Defence Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian announced that France would send another 1,000 troops to the CAR.

UN Deputy Secretary General Jan Eliasson: “Children and women are at the greatest risk”

“We cannot have a country fall apart like that,” he told Europe 1 radio: “There is the violence, massacres and humanitarian chaos that follow a collapse.”

He added that – as was the case of France’s intervention in Mali earlier this year- the troops would be deployed for “a short period, in the range of six months”.

The UN Security Council is expected next week to adopt a resolution authorising the deployment of African Union troops with French support in the impoverished nation.

There are currently some 2,500 African troops in CAR, due to be increased to 3,600 by January 2014.

“A country in the heart of Africa is descending into complete chaos before our eyes,” Mr Eliasson told the 15-member council on Monday.

“The situation requires prompt and decisive action.”

Central African Republic crisis in numbers

Earlier this month, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said communal violence in the CAR risked spiralling out of control.

Mr Ban backed the establishment of a UN peacekeeping force before the crisis leads to widespread atrocities.

The rebels – known as the Seleka – have replaced President Bozize with their own commander, Michel Djotodia.

Armed gangs, mainly former Seleka rebels, who are mostly Muslim, now control most of the landlocked country.

Some are mercenaries from neighbouring countries, such as Chad and the Darfur region of Sudan.

Mr Djotodia, the country’s first Muslim leader, has formally disbanded the rebels and integrated many fighters into the national army.

French troops patrol a street in Bangui. Photo: October 2013 France currently has some 400 soldiers patrolling the capital, Bangui

But former rebels linked to Seleka have continued to launch attacks on scores of villages, prompting the emergence of local civilian protection groups.

The government in Bangui denies targeting any group, but recognises the rise in inter-community violence.

Jordanian King Abdullah Cozying-Up To Radical Islamists

Jordan’s king and the Islamists: In one boat?

 

JPost
By MUDAR ZAHRAN

 

Unlike what many of Jordan’s king supporters in the West might believe, he is not an anti-Islamist, and the Jordanian public is not pro-MB.

Jordan's King Abdullah

Jordan’s King Abdullah Photo: REUTERS

With the Arab Spring boiling, it is would be rather naive for anyone to assume any Arab regime is immune to a revolution. Nonetheless, many in Israel and elsewhere seem to believe the kingdom of Jordan is stable. Those people should just listen to the king himself.

In a congressional hearing, US Senator Lindsey Graham said Jordan’s king had told him he “did not think he would be in power within a year from now” because of the crisis in Syria. To which US Chief of Staff General Martin Dempsey responded: “Yes, that is basically his fear.”

The weekly anti-regime protests in Jordan have almost stopped; this has been celebrated by some of the pro-king journalists in the West. Nonetheless, they have celebrated too early, because Jordanians have switched from peaceful protesting to violence.

In the past few weeks, violent riots, confrontations with the police and full-scale gun battles have hit downtown Amman, the Gaza refugee camp, Irbid in the north and all the way down to the ancient city of Petra. A dozen Jordanians have been killed.

Still, ongoing violence in Jordan receives little media coverage; with Al Jazeera in particular barely reporting anything negative on Jordan.

This has been very helpful to the king as Al Jazeera is one of the world’s main sources for Middle East news, that has been a catalyzer for most Arab revolutions.

With no logical explanation for Al Jazeera’s stance, one fact remains: many of Al Jazeera’s top managers and producers are Jordanian Muslim Brotherhood (MB) members.

In fact, the longest serving general manager for Al Jazeera was Waddah Khanfar, who is a known Jordanian MB figure.

Unlike the MB in Egypt and elsewhere, Jordan’s MB has been in a nearly full partnership with the ruling regime.

For a starter, Jordan’s MB supported the Hashemite regime in the 1970 civil war and even declared fighting against the Palestinian militias with King Hussein “a jihad.”

In November 2012, a full-scale revolution started in Jordan. Hundreds of thousands of Jordanians from Palestinian refugee camps and East Bankers’ areas took to the street calling for the king to step down and leave the country. The MB stood against these protesters and disrupted their movement for weeks.

At the same time, the MB leadership issued a public press release in which their leader Zaki Bani Rushied said: “We have chosen to reform the regime and not to topple it.”

But why would the MB choose for Jordan’s king to stay rather than be ousted? It would have made sense if this became the MB’s stance after Egypt’s Mohamed Morsi was ousted, but this was the MB’s position since day one.

The answer might lie in the fact that Jordan’s king and his father have been the only Arab rulers who allowed the MB to exist as a registered charity, enabling the MB to have its own private schools, private universities, hospitals, Islamic banks and even their own newspaper and TV station.

Today, while Jordan’s king imprisons and tortures seculars calling for reform, he allows the MB to organize anti-Israel/ anti-US protests under the protection and facilitation of the Jordanian police. This way, the king manages to use the MB as a scarecrow to play on Israel’s fear factor, claiming the Islamists would take over Jordan if he falls to the Arab Spring.

A SEASONED Jordanian journalist who spoke to me recently on the condition of anonymity claimed the king’s office has been reaching out to Western and Israeli journalists, analysts and commentators to claim he was under the threat of an MB takeover.

An internal MB memo leaked to CNN Arabic in December 2012 showed the MB believed its influence over the Jordanian street had diminished. If that is the case, the MB may not be likely to place a president in office if the king falls, as they have been failing to impress the rather secular Palestinian majority.

In short, MB seems to know if the king falls, it could fall with him too.

Jordanian-Palestinian political figure Emad Tarifi told me: “If parliamentary elections were held today, the MB will barely get 15% of the vote, they are no longer popular and the public has come to realize they are in bed with the king.”

Tarifi himself is an example; despite being a secular opposition figure, the king’s intelligence service has confiscated his passport and keeps harassing him, while hardcore MB fundamentalist hold government jobs and recruit members openly.

Further, in the same week Egypt’s new government outlawed the MB, Jordan’s king announced he would not do the same.

In addition, Jordan’s MB leaders have been rallying public support for the king; recently, MB’s spiritual mentor, Hamzah Mansour, described the king as “a man for all Jordanians,” and his second in command, Salem Falahat, bragged that the MB had “cleansed the revolution,” a remark that provoked Jordanian seculars, who claim Falahat targeted them with his remark.

Even more, while the country is still raging with violence, the MB started organizing anti-Israel protests, which the king’s media has been publicizing; possibly to reinforce Israel’s fears of change in Jordan.

While Jordan’s king still has some cheerleaders in the Western and Israeli media, they either deliberately or ignorantly overlook the fact that the seculars are now the king’s enemies and the Islamists are supporting him.

Unlike what many of Jordan’s king supporters in the West might believe, he is not an anti-Islamist, and the Jordanian public is not pro-MB.

Jordan is not immune to change and those who care for peace in the region must open the door to Jordan’s secular opposition, or at least give them a hearing.

The author is a Palestinian writer and academic from Jordan.

Turkey Tries To Realign Interests With Shiite Neighbors

Turkey mending ties with Shiite powers as regional clout wanes

France 24

AFP – Turkey’s ambitions to become a regional leader with a “zero problems” foreign policy have been left in tatters by the Syrian civil war, rising sectarian tensions and a fresh diplomatic fallout with Egypt.

The predominantly Sunni Muslim NATO member state is now seeking to mend fences with Shiite powers Iraq and Iran to restore its waning clout in the Middle East in the wake of the Arab spring uprisings.

The Syrian conflict has upset the balance of power in Turkey’s backyard and dealt a blow to Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s lofty regional goals, his stature on the international stage also tarnished by the wave of anti-government protests that gripped the country in June.

Disputes with Israel, Cyprus and Armenia also linger on, while the spat with Cairo came to a head Saturday when Egypt’s military rulers expelled Turkey’s ambassador over Erdogan’s support for ousted Islamist president Mohamed Morsi.

“Today Turkey is a country which is drifting alone in a vacuum,” said Faruk Logoglu, deputy head of the secular Republican People’s Party (CHP) and a former ambassador to Washington.

‘Turkey failed to respond realistically to Arab spring’

Turkey now has no ambassadors in three key regional states: Egypt, Israel and Syria.

“In fact there is ‘no zero problem’ policy left to talk about,” said Sinan Ulgen, chairman of the Istanbul Centre for Economics and Foreign Policy Studies.

“Turkey failed to respond through realistic diplomatic moves to the changes in the region in the aftermath of the Arab spring,” he told AFP.

Erdogan, accused by critics of becoming increasingly authoritarian after 11 years at the head of a government with its roots in conservative political Islam, defiantly defended his actions as ensuring that Turkey was on the side of the righteous.

“We have supported the struggle for democracy in the world. We never respect those who do not respect the people’s sovereign rights,” he said.

But Ulgen warned the crisis with Egypt would also have wider repercussions, including an impact on Ankara’s partnership with the oil-rich Gulf monarchies. Turkey, he said, was now on a “quest for a new balance” in its foreign policy, hence the overtures to Iraq and Iran.

Ankara’s relations with the two Shiite Muslim-led powers have been strained since the Syrian uprising erupted in 2011, leaving them on opposite sides of the war.

Faysal Itani from the Atlantic Council, a US think tank, said Turkey’s “early aggressive stance” against President Bashar al-Assad’s regime and its fervent support for the rebels had alienated its neighbours.

“Turkey probably saw this as a price worth paying. But I imagine they did not expect the regime to hold out against the rebels for so long,” Itani told AFP.

“Erdogan is re-evaluating Turkey’s regional posture in light of the disappointments of its Syria policy.”

Turkey felt sidelined when the United States, its close NATO ally, decided against military strikes on Syria after an August chemical weapons attack.

Ankara in turn has faced accusations from some quarters in the United States that it is turning a blind eye to radical Al-Qaeda fighters crossing its long border to join the battle against Assad.

Erdogan’s government is now looking to Iran and Iraq to help contain the conflict as it grapples with the mass influx of an estimated 600,000 refugees from across the border, warning that Syria could become a Mediterranean Afghanistan or Somalia if world powers fail to act.

Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu is heading to Tehran Monday, barely three weeks since his Iranian counterpart Mohammad Javad Zarif paid a visit to Ankara, where both men said they were ready to work together against ethnic and sectarian strife in the Middle East.

“We have more agreements than disagreements on regional issues,” Zarif said.

Both sides have been pushing for a thaw after the June election of Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, which has seen Tehran open the door for dialogue with the West and renew talks with world powers on its contested nuclear programme.

And Turkey, which has little energy resources of its own, has shrugged off US pressure for it to reduce its imports of oil and gas from sanctions-hit Iran, its major supplier along with Russia.

Earlier this month, Davutoglu also visited Iraq to seek a “fresh start” after two years of tensions.

The two governments had locked horns on issues ranging from Syria to the Kurds of Iraq.

Turkey is also alarmed by the growing influence of Kurdish militants in northern Syria and fears a de facto Kurdish state there — similar to one already established in Iraq — could provide a rear base of operations for Turkish Kurd fighters.

Earlier this month, a Kurdish militia dominated by a party close to Turkey’s main Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) declared provisional self-rule in Syrian areas under their control.

Ankara said it cannot accept a fait accompli.

“Turkey may be feeling it needs to balance its hostility towards the Syrian regime with developing options to contain the Syrian Kurds, and could be shoring up relations with Iraq and Iran to that end,” said Itani.

With Turkey on the hunt for new friends, opposition lawmaker Muslim Sari labelled Davutoglu as the “least successful foreign minister in the history of the Turkish republic”

Saudis Blame Qatar for Doing What CIA Wanted In Egypt and Yemen

Riyadh asks GCC states to condemn Qatar’s actions in Egypt and Yemen

Middle east monitor

Saudi and Qatari FlagSaudi-Qatari relations are extremely tense as a result of Doha’s policies towards post-coup Egypt

A diplomatic source told Agence France Presse (AFP) on Sunday that the tripartite meeting held on Saturday night in Riyadh between Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Qatar came in the wake of a Saudi request from the Gulf Cooperation Council to “condemn the actions of Qatar” in Egypt and Yemen. The source, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said that Saudi Arabia is “very irritated by the policy of Qatar in Egypt” and Yemen.The same source said that the Emir of Kuwait, Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmad al-Sabah, tried to mediate between the two countries in order not to lose the annual summit that will gather the leaders of the six GCC states in his country next month. He noted that last week, during visits by Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal to some Arab Gulf capitals, Riyadh made its request that the GCC issue a statement condemning the actions of Qatar in Egypt and Yemen. Al-Faisal carried messages from King Abdullah to the leaders of four Gulf States: Oman, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait and Bahrain.

During the Riyadh meeting, the Saudi monarch, the Emir of Kuwait and the Emir of Qatar reviewed issues of mutual concern as well as cooperation among GCC states.

Commenting on the situation, one European diplomat told AFP that Saudi-Qatari relations are extremely tense as a result of Doha’s policies towards post-coup Egypt. The small Gulf state has been the main supporter of ousted President Mohammed Morsi, and has expressed concerns about his overthrow amid fears that an Algerian scenario may be repeated in Egypt.

Riyadh asks GCC states to condemn Qatar’s actions in Egypt and Yemen

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Saudi and Qatari FlagSaudi-Qatari relations are extremely tense as a result of Doha’s policies towards post-coup Egypt

A diplomatic source told Agence France Presse (AFP) on Sunday that the tripartite meeting held on Saturday night in Riyadh between Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Qatar came in the wake of a Saudi request from the Gulf Cooperation Council to “condemn the actions of Qatar” in Egypt and Yemen. The source, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said that Saudi Arabia is “very irritated by the policy of Qatar in Egypt” and Yemen.The same source said that the Emir of Kuwait, Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmad al-Sabah, tried to mediate between the two countries in order not to lose the annual summit that will gather the leaders of the six GCC states in his country next month. He noted that last week, during visits by Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal to some Arab Gulf capitals, Riyadh made its request that the GCC issue a statement condemning the actions of Qatar in Egypt and Yemen. Al-Faisal carried messages from King Abdullah to the leaders of four Gulf States: Oman, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait and Bahrain.

During the Riyadh meeting, the Saudi monarch, the Emir of Kuwait and the Emir of Qatar reviewed issues of mutual concern as well as cooperation among GCC states.

Commenting on the situation, one European diplomat told AFP that Saudi-Qatari relations are extremely tense as a result of Doha’s policies towards post-coup Egypt. The small Gulf state has been the main supporter of ousted President Mohammed Morsi, and has expressed concerns about his overthrow amid fears that an Algerian scenario may be repeated in Egypt.

– See more at: http://www.middleeastmonitor.com/news/middle-east/8496-riyadh-asks-gcc-states-to-condemn-qatars-actions-in-egypt-and-yemen#sthash.zsJc5tZM.dpuf