Pakistan Naming Haqqani To Head Afghan Taliban

Pakistan is giving Taliban leadership to Haqqanis: India’s Ambassador to Kabul

The Hindu

India’s delay in taking a clear position on the negotiation between the Taliban and the Pakistan government might end up justifying Pakistan’s current strategy for the Taliban, The Hindu was told by Amar Sinha, Ambassador of India to Kabul.

Mr Sinha said that the recent attack on Taliban leader Mullah Akhtar Mansour in Quetta had shown that rivalry is intense inside Taliban and India should intervene as Pakistan seems to be negotiating with only one faction of Taliban apart from giving leadership space to the Haqqani network, which is on the verge of getting international recognition as the de facto Taliban, due to Pakistan’s initiative.

Mr. Sinha spoke to The Hindu after the Afghan media splashed his opinion questioning the reported agreement, reached in Paris between the President of Afghanistan and the Prime Minister of Pakistan on the dialogue with the Taliban.

He clarified that the Pakistan media and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs reacted without perusing the entire text of what he had stated. “Meeting of Heads of Governments in Paris is a positive thing. I stated that the statement of Pakistan Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif in Paris is positive and we will see reduction in violence if we stay on a track built by consultation,” he said.

He said that Afghanistan’s cooperation with Pakistan under the present set of circumstances will mean Afghanistan allowing Pakistan to determine the Taliban leadership which should not happen as the Afghanistan’s peace will have to be determined by the Afghans themselves.

“Indian media should question the charade of Mullah Omar’s death, the quick coronation of Mullah Akhtar Mansour and the hurried attempt to start talks with Taliban even before the issue of Taliban’s leadership is resolved” Mr Sinha told The Hindu from Kabul. He pointed out that Pakistan is trying to convince Afghanistan to come along to a bad deal with Taliban.

He warned that under the present arrangement with the Taliban, even the Haqqani Network will be party to the package being discussed between the Taliban and Pakistan. “How will the Haqqani network play a key role in future without being stricken off the terror list of various countries?” asked Mr. Sinha.

The consequence of Pakistan’s peace negotiation with the Taliban, he said, will be that the international community will be presented with a “fait accompli” of dealing with the Haqqani network as the legitimate Taliban leadership.

Mr. Sinha said that Afghans perceive India as a shining part of South Asia and they expect India to speak forcefully on issues of regional interest. He said that the Heart of Asia conference of December 7 provides a new opportunity to bring peace to Afghanistan and should be given a chance as it promises an “Afghan-led peace process”.

Pakistan’s Anti-Iranian Terrorist Group Jundullah Now Fighting For ISIS In Kunduz, Afghanistan

[Pakistan’ latest anti-terrorist offensive has to be rated as a rousing success, in that they have obviously evicted most of their own homegrown terrorist menace by ejecting them into Afghanistan.  In Afghanistan, many of them have been swooped-up and hired as the new emissaries of ISIS.  First the dejected, rag-tag forces of Pakistani Taliban (TTP), under the command of mad-dog mullah Fazlullah declared themselves as “ISIS,” soon to be followed by Uzbek terrorists, IMU (SEE: Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan declares it is now part of ISIS group), with unsubstantiated reports linking ISIS to Mullah Mansour Dadullah (brother of Taliban legend Mullah Dadullah), despite Mullah Mansour’s protests.  Recent gun battles between Dadullah and Pakistani-selected Taliban leader Akhtar Mansour have been reported in certain quarters as a battle between Taliban and ISIS, even though it was all within the Afghan Taliban.  Akhtar Mansour allegedly died in that gunfight.)

NDS Arrest 11 Jundullah Insurgents in Kunduz Operation

tolo newstolo news

NDS-forces-Afghanistan

At least 11 members of Jundullah insurgent network were arrested in a military operation in northern Kunduz province, the National Directorate of Security (NDS) said in a statement on Wednesday.

The statement said that the insurgents were captured in a military operation in Dar-e-Sof village of Khan Abad district of Kunduz while they were collecting Zakat (almsgiving) from the people.

During the operation the forces also discovered a number of military uniforms as well as small and heavy weapons.

However, the statement did not provide more details about the operation.

FACEBOOK Names Tashfeen Malik As “Volunteer at ISI (Pakistan’s) Inter Service Intelligence”

Syed FarookTashfeen Malik2

“Here is what we know about the attackers: Syed Rizwan Farook and Tashfeen Malik.

They are a couple

Farook and his wife left their 6-month-old girl with Farook’s grandmother Wednesday and said they had a doctor’s appointment.”

Who are Syed Rezwan Farook and Tashfeen Malik?

[I had intended to merely post the CNN version of this story and then wait to find more clarification….I FOUND IT….the photo of Tashfeen Malik posted on the web by ABC News led me to the following Facebook of Tashfeen Malik, where she is listed as a

“Volunteer at ISI-Inter Service Intelligence”……………………….
WHAT THE HELL?]

tashfeen malik facebook

[TASHFEEN’S ISI LINK LED DIRECTLY TO THE PAGE POSTED BELOW…ISI.]

ISI

Pakistan Giving India the “Bum’s Rush” In Afghanistan

Pakistan turning Haqqani network into Taliban’s leader: India’s Ambassador to Kabul

The Hindu

Kallol Bhattacherjee

India’s delay in taking a clear position on the negotiation between the Taliban and the Pakistan government might end up justifying Pakistan’s current strategy for the Taliban, The Hindu was told by Amar Sinha, Ambassador of India to Kabul.

Mr Sinha said that the recent attack on Taliban leader Mullah Akhtar Mansour in Quetta had shown that rivalry is intense inside Taliban and India should intervene as Pakistan seems to be negotiating with only one faction of Taliban apart from giving leadership space to the Haqqani network, which is on the verge of getting international recognition as the de facto Taliban, due to Pakistan’s initiative.

Mr. Sinha spoke to The Hindu after the Afghan media splashed his opinion questioning the reported agreement, reached in Paris between the President of Afghanistan and the Prime Minister of Pakistan on the dialogue with the Taliban.

He clarified that the Pakistan media and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs reacted without perusing the entire text of what he had stated. “Meeting of Heads of Governments in Paris is a positive thing. I stated that the statement of Pakistan Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif in Paris is positive and we will see reduction in violence if we stay on a track built by consultation,” he said.

He said that Afghanistan’s cooperation with Pakistan under the present set of circumstances will mean Afghanistan allowing Pakistan to determine the Taliban leadership which should not happen as the Afghanistan’s peace will have to be determined by the Afghans themselves.

“Indian media should question the charade of Mullah Omar’s death, the quick coronation of Mullah Akhtar Mansour and the hurried attempt to start talks with Taliban even before the issue of Taliban’s leadership is resolved” Mr Sinha told The Hindu from Kabul. He pointed out that Pakistan is trying to convince Afghanistan to come along to a bad deal with Taliban.

He warned that under the present arrangement with the Taliban, even the Haqqani Network will be party to the package being discussed between the Taliban and Pakistan. “How will the Haqqani network play a key role in future without being stricken off the terror list of various countries?” asked Mr. Sinha.

The consequence of Pakistan’s peace negotiation with the Taliban, he said, will be that the international community will be presented with a “fait accompli” of dealing with the Haqqani network as the legitimate Taliban leadership.

Mr. Sinha said that Afghans perceive India as a shining part of South Asia and they expect India to speak forcefully on issues of regional interest. He said that the Heart of Asia conference of December 7 provides a new opportunity to bring peace to Afghanistan and should be given a chance as it promises an “Afghan-led peace process”.

How our foreign policy fuels terrorism

How our foreign policy fuels terrorism

WEBSTER U
WEBSTER U2

By Mike Thomas, Webster student

 

The recent waves of terrorist attacks in the Sinai Peninsula, Beirut and Paris have shocked the world. The Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) has taken credit for these reprehensible and inhumane acts. Are these attacks part of the “volcanoes of jihad” that ISIS caliph Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi promised? If so, is our current strategy going to eliminate this vile group?

According to CNN, ISIS used a bomb disguised as a soda to blow up Russian Flight 9286 out of the sky in the Sinai Peninsula, killing all 224 passengers. Just a day before the Paris attacks, an ISIS suicide bomber killed 43 people. The day of the Paris tragedy, ISIS slaughtered over 130 people during six coordinated attacks on Friday, Nov. 13.

The United States started a global war on terror after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Instead of focusing on Osama Bin Laden’s al Qaeda group, then-President George W. Bush turned his attention to Saddam Hussein. The Bush administration used false intelligence to promote a war that did not have the support of the international community.

The Iraq War was a disaster for all parties involved. It was extremely costly, divided the U.S. public and wrecked Iraq. The U.S. instigated a sectarian civil war by disbanding the Sunni Iraqi army, and empowering a Shi’ite Iraqi government. To this day, Iraq is divided between Arabs and Kurds, Sunni Muslims and Shi’ite Muslims.

The U.S. and its allies did not learn from their mistakes after Iraq. During the 2011 Arab Spring, President Barack Obama joined France, Britain, Saudi Arabia and other allies in bombing Libya in support of rebel factions. After an eight-month bombing campaign, Muammar Gaddafi was toppled. Four years later, Libya has no functioning government and extremist groups have taken over the country.

The Arab Spring protests also spread to Syria. According to the White House, U.S. policy since 2011 is that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad must resign. U.S. allies such as Saudi Arabia, Turkey and the Gulf Arab states sent dollars and arms to the opposition fighters and Syria fell to a violent civil war. The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), the Pentagon and European nations also began programs to arm and train anti-Assad rebels in Syria.

These policies have led to the rise of ISIS in all three countries. The so-called Free Syrian Army does not really exist, and there are no “moderate rebels” within Syria. With the exception of the Kurds, the non-ISIS rebel groups are jihadist radicals. The strongest one being the al-Nusra Front, which is the Syrian al Qaeda affiliate. If the moderate group is al Qaeda, then why the hell do we want to take out Assad?

The truth is that our Middle Eastern allies interests are not our own. Saudi Arabia uses their oil wealth to export Wahhabi extremism; funding madrassas, mosques and militant groups. Wikileaks published a 2009 memo from Secretary of State Hillary Clinton that said, “donors in Saudi Arabia constitute the most significant source of funding to Sunni groups worldwide.” The Saudis use these terrorist proxies to battle their Shi’ite Iranian enemies.

Turkey is more interested in deposing Assad, and killing the Kurdish independence movement. The Turks have allowed foreign fighters to cross their borders to join the anti-Assad insurgency. The Gulf Arab states, Saudi Arabia and Turkey have not lifted a finger to stop ISIS and may be funding them to take out their geopolitical enemies.

If we really wanted to destroy ISIS, we would partner with Iran and Russia. Iran is a Shi’ite nation that fights Sunni terrorist groups like ISIS and al Qaeda. Russian President Vladimir Putin has offered to work with us and is currently bombing both groups in Syria and Iraq. According to The Telegraph, French President Francois Hollande has called for France, Russia and the U.S. to unite forces. Obama should include all nations against ISIS in the coalition, and cut off support for allies who continue to back terrorist groups.