UN Human Rights Comm. Demands Access To Kashmir

‘Pakistan welcomes UNHRC’s request to visit IHK’

A photo taken at the surgical ICU hospital in Srinagar on July 16, 2016 shows the X-ray of 14-year-old Kashmiri Muslim girl, Insha Malik, showing the multiple pellet marks on her face that have left her blind in both eyes, after she was shot by Indian security forces. According to relatives, Insha was on the first floor of her home when forces fired pellet guns into the building on July 12. She was rushed to the hospital and joined hundreds of injured Kashmiris who have reported devastating eye injuries caused by "non-lethal" pellet gun firings. The death of popular rebel leader Burhan Wani in a gunfight with government forces last week sparked clashes in which more than 3,000 people, including about 200 police officers, have been injured. It is the worst civilian violence to hit the region since 2010, when mass protests broke out and left 120 dead. Hospitals in the main city of Srinagar have struggled to cope with the rush of wounded, hundreds of them with severe injuries in their eyes.  / AFP / TAUSEEF MUSTAFA        (Photo credit should read TAUSEEF MUSTAFA/AFP/Getty Images)

A photo taken at the surgical ICU hospital in Srinagar on July 16, 2016 shows the X-ray of 14-year-old Kashmiri Muslim girl, Insha Malik, showing the multiple pellet marks on her face that have left her blind in both eyes, after she was shot by Indian security forces.
According to relatives, Insha was on the first floor of her home when forces fired pellet guns into the building on July 12. She was rushed to the hospital and joined hundreds of injured Kashmiris who have reported devastating eye injuries caused by “non-lethal” pellet gun firings. The death of popular rebel leader Burhan Wani in a gunfight with government forces last week sparked clashes in which more than 3,000 people, including about 200 police officers, have been injured. It is the worst civilian violence to hit the region since 2010, when mass protests broke out and left 120 dead. Hospitals in the main city of Srinagar have struggled to cope with the rush of wounded, hundreds of them with severe injuries in their eyes.
/ AFP / TAUSEEF MUSTAFA (Photo credit should read TAUSEEF MUSTAFA/AFP/Getty Images)

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan welcomes that the UN Human Rights High Commissioner (UNHRC), Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, has raised in his opening statement the issue of the use of excessive force by Indian authorities in Indian-held Kashmir (IHK), to the 33rd session of the Human Rights Council that started on Thursday in Geneva.

We strongly support the High Commissioner’s position that an OHCHR team should visit Indian-held Kashmir to independently investigate the grave human rights violations being perpetrated by Indian forces, resulting in the killing of more than 90 civilians and 8,000 injured, including those with severe pellet gun injuries.

The visit by the OHCHR team would help to end the culture of impunity, which is prevailing for more than 68 years in IHK, in violation of international law and UN Security Council resolutions, said a statement of the FO.

Pakistan has expressed its readiness for the visit of any UN team sent by the UN high commissioner for Human Rights to Azad Jammu and Kashmir together with the Indian-held Kashmir, even though there is no comparison whatsoever between the situation in AJK and the rampant human rights violations and oppression in IHK, it said.

“We note the high commissioner’s statement that he awaits a formal letter from India for access to IHK. We urge India to respond to this request,” it added.