Saudi Terrorist Indoctrination Program Hidden Within Bin Naif Rehabilitation Program

[As you can see in the links posted below, the subject of Guantanamo secret brainwashing and mind control have been a favorite topic on this site for a long time, especially relating to the idea of “proactively targeting terrorism from captured terrorists.”  There is a body of common evidence which describes the relationship of Guantanamo prison to virtually every major Sunni terrorist group in the world.  Every terrorist group embraces those militants released from Gitmo, where they always take leadership positions.  Guantanamo has cultivated a generation of militant, radical Islamist leaders, under the guise of “terrorist rehabilitation and reconditioning.”  The intimate symbiosis between Guantanamo and the Saudi rehabilitation center, Prince Mohammed bin Nayef Center for Care and Counseling.  The Saudi reconditioning program is the model used by nearly every Western country which has a terrorist rehab program, including Pakistan.  If the Saudis are really running a terrorist training program disguised as a rehabilitation program, then all of these countries are knowingly, or unknowingly, doing the same. 

(SEE:  TRANSCRIPT OF DETAINEE ISN682/20160623 U ISN682)

“there is a strong externally…a strong de-radicalization program, but make no mistake, underneath there is a hidden radicalization program. There is a very hidden stronger, way stronger in magnitude, broader in
financing and in… in all that.”
They need a jihadist, but they want you to be a
compliant terrorist. They need … they want al-Qaeda…they want you to be a jihadist.
They want you to … to fight under their cloak – under the royal
Saudi cloak, under the religious establishment cloak.”]

image-543

Guantanamo prisoner claims Saudi Arabia’s rehab program for terrorists is really a front for recruiting jihadists

daily mail

[SEE THE FOLLOWING–]

Al-Qaida in Arabian Peninsula=Guantanamo/Mossad, ISIS=Camp Bucca, Iraq
Guantanamo and The Saudi Rehabilitation Program Behind AQAP–(Intentional, or Major Fowl-UP?)
The Saudi Terrorist “Rehabilitation” Scam—Munasha
Detention Operations, Behavior Modification, and Counterinsurgency
Yemen–al-Munasaha , Saudi Re-Education
Batch 10
Yemen al-Qaeda link to Guantanamo Bay prison
What is the truth about ISIS?

 

  • Ghassan Abdullah al-Sharbi said rehab program at the Prince Mohammed bin Naif Counseling and Care Center is actually working to recruit jihadists
  • The Saudi centers in Riyadh and Jeddah include psychological counseling and religious clerics on hand to clarify ideology
  • Those enrolled are supposed to be reintegrated into society through activities like swimming, ping-pong, and art therapy
  • But al-Sharbi said ‘underneath there is a hidden radicalization program’

An al Qaeda operative told a parole board at Guantanamo Bay that a Saudi reform program for terrorists is actually a front for recruiting jihadists, according to declassified documents.

Ghassan Abdullah al-Sharbi said the program at the Prince Mohammed bin Naif Counseling and Care Center, which was thought to have played a key role in Saudi Arabia’s counter-terrorism strategy, is not what it appears to be.

Dozens of Guantanamo detainees, including Osama bin Laden’s former bodyguard, have been sent through to the program as a condition of their release as President Obama hopes to close the prison before he leaves office.

The center, which includes activities like swimming, ping-pong, and art therapy, has been compared to a holiday resort, and those who complete the 12-step program are rewarded with young brides and new cars, the New York Post reported.

Ghassan Abdullah al-Sharbi told a parole board at Guantanamo Bay that a Saudi reform program for terrorists (pictured in 2009) is actually a front for recruiting jihadists

Ghassan Abdullah al-Sharbi told a parole board at Guantanamo Bay that a Saudi reform program for terrorists (pictured in 2009) is actually a front for recruiting jihadists

Dozens of Guantanamo detainees have been sent through to the program as a condition for their release. Programs include art therapy

Dozens of Guantanamo detainees have been sent through to the program as a condition for their release. Programs include art therapy

According to the Post, 134 Saudi detainees have been sent to the rehab centers in Riyadh and Jeddah.

The facilities are meant to help former jihadists integrate into society, with psychologists on hand to determine problematic social factors while religious officials are there to clarify ideologies, the New York Times reported.

Those who are sent to the center also have access to a PlayStation, gourmet meals, and private apartments for conjugal visits, the Post reported.

But Al-Sharbi told the parole board: ‘You guys want to send me back to Saudi Arabia because you believe there is a de-radicalization program on the surface, true.

‘You are 100 per cent right, there is a strong…de-radicalization program, but make no mistake, underneath there is a hidden radicalization program.’

Al-Sharbi, who faced the Periodic Review Board after 14 years, said he did not want to enroll in the 12-step rehab program fearing he would be ‘used’ to ‘fight under the Saudi royal cloak.’

He said: ‘When they release you they wanna make sure that you’re still under that cloak and they got you to fight their jihad in their regions and in the States.’

The facilities are meant to help former jihadists integrate into society, with psychologists and religious officials on hand (pictured released Gitmo detainees listening to a Muslim cleric)

The facilities are meant to help former jihadists integrate into society, with psychologists and religious officials on hand (pictured released Gitmo detainees listening to a Muslim cleric)

Those who are sent to the center also have access to a PlayStation, gourmet meals, and private apartments for conjugal visits, although about 20 per cent return to terrorism

Those who are sent to the center also have access to a PlayStation, gourmet meals, and private apartments for conjugal visits, although about 20 per cent return to terrorism

He added: ‘They will proudly tell you they will fight terrorism. That means they will support it.’

He also added that fighters are being recruited and trained to face off against Iranians in Yemen and Syria.

Earlier this year, the Periodic Review Board, created under Obama’s administration in 2011, agreed to release Muhammed Al Shumrani after his lawyers argued that enrolling him in the rehab program would help.

About 20 per cent of those who enroll in the rehab program return to terrorism, the Post reported.

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The road at the centre of the struggle for Afghan influence

The road at the centre of the struggle for Afghan influence

today

 

JALALABAD (Afghanistan) — Giant trucks thunder along the main stretch of highway that peels away from the Pakistani border, carrying cement, fruit and chemicals to the Afghan city of Jalalabad.

Vulnerable to attacks from Taliban and Islamic State (IS) militants, the crucial 74km expanse of road that runs near the famed Khyber Pass is undergoing a major facelift after security concerns forced a seven-year delay in the project.

As well as paving the way for an expansion in bilateral trade between the two countries, the road is at the centre of the struggle between Pakistan and India to maintain influence over Afghanistan.

Strategic interests

“It’s strategic interests that are prompting investment in Afghanistan,” Mr Imtiaz Gul, executive director at the Centre for Research and Security Studies in Islamabad. “Goodwill is secondary.”

In the last decade, India’s investment in Afghanistan has created discomfort for Pakistan, he noted.

Last month, Pakistan pledged a further US$500 million (S$712 million) to help rebuild Afghanistan, in addition to an existing US$500 million package on health, education and infrastructure that includes a 400-bed hospital in Kabul and more than 2,000 scholarships for Afghan students.

India, too, has focused on building infrastructure such as dams, highways, and power frameworks as well as the new Parliament in Kabul. It has largely refrained from supporting Kabul militarily because of Pakistani sensitivities, said Mr Dhruva Jaishankar, fellow at the Brookings India think-tank.

“For India, the priority is a stable and plural Afghanistan, and the defeat of the Taliban. This would ensure that the region is not a hotbed for terrorism and is instead a conduit to Central Asia,” Mr Jaishankar said.

Militant insurgency

Meanwhile, Afghanistan remains in the grip of a resurgent Taliban and repeated attacks from IS militants.

Bilateral relations between Afghanistan and Pakistan have been severely strained over Pakistan’s support for the Taliban, presenting significant challenges to economic development in the region, said Mr Abdul Baqi Amin, director of Centre for Strategic and Regional Studies in Kabul. The neighbours accuse each other of harbouring militants who carry out assaults on both sides of the border.

Nevertheless, Pakistan is Afghanistan’s largest trading partner, with annual trade of around US$2 billion. The two governments pledged to raise bilateral trade to US$5 billion by next year.

Some of this investment is bearing fruit. Last year, Afghanistan and Pakistan trade increased from US$1.03 billion to US$1.7 billion, according to Pakistan central bank figures, and Pakistan, as one of South Asia’s fastest-growing economies, is eyeing the central Asian markets for trade expansion.

Trade between Pakistan and central Asian republics combined accounted for just US$74.27 million in 2015-16, according to the Pakistan Trade Development Authority. With the expansion of the Torkhum-Jalalabad road, Islamabad is also looking to the expansion of the corridor to central Asia, creating an economic engine for the region.

Historic roadway

As the main gateway to Afghanistan, more than half of Afghanistan’s 2014 trade with the rest of the world was conducted via Pakistan’s two border crossings — Torkham in the north and Chaman in the south, according to the Pakistan Business Council.

“If you see the history, people just came here to fight,” said Mr Amjad Ali, director of the road project for Pakistan’s national highway authority, referring to the use of the Torkham crossing by North Atlantic Treaty Organisation forces prior to 2014, as well as the long history of invasions via the Khyber Pass. “Now, more than 600 trucks each day cross the border via this road, and once the second carriageway is completed and the mechanism at border is upgraded, it will go up further.”

Pakistan is among the best-performing economies in Asia, and Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif aims to boost it further after China pledged to invest US$46 billion in an economic corridor linking its less-developed western part to Pakistan’s deep-sea port of Gwadar.

Despite the harsh exchange of words between Pakistan and India, Pakistan’s Minister for Planning and Reform, and the brains behind Mr Sharif’s development policy, Mr Ahsan Iqbal, offered an unexpected olive branch, inviting India to join China’s corridor in order to promote economic growth in south and central Asia.

“We need to normalise ties in this part of the world,” Mr Iqbal said in an interview earlier this month. “A better political environment is the key to better economic cooperation.” BLOOMBERG