BLA/BRA Militants Surrendering In Balochistan By the Hundreds–400+ Served

Over 400 militants surrender in Balochistan

Baloch militants carry their weapons as they prepare to surrender to Pakistani security forces in Quetta.
Baloch militants carry their weapons as they prepare to surrender to Pakistani security forces in Quetta.
QUETTA: As many as 434 militants belonging to different banned outfits have surrendered in Pakistan’s restive Balochistan province.

The militants, who handed over their arms to authorities here on Friday, belong to the Baloch Republican Army (BRA), Baloch Liberation Army (BLA) and other separatist groups alleged to have carried out attacks on security installations and personnel in the troubled province.

Commander Southern Command Lieutenant General Amir Riaz said on the occasion that those wanting to return to normal life were welcome to do so after surrendering.

“Anyone laying down their arms would be welcomed,” he said.

The militants pledged their allegiance to the state of Pakistan at the ceremony, which was also attended by the provincial chief minister.

Pakistan has been battling insurgency in mineral-rich Balochistan since 2004, with hundreds of soldiers and militants killed in the fighting.

A greater push towards peace and development by Pakistani authorities, including starting work on roads and infrastructure under the Chinese-assisted CPEC project — which connects Balochistan’s deep sea port Gwadar to China — has reduced the violence considerably.

“These militants had killed my own son and brother but I have forgiven them. The state of Pakistan also forgives them and I welcome them to be part of Balochistan’s CPEC project,” said Balochistan chief minister Sanaullah Zehri at the ceremony.

In Baloch everyone is militant, so how many surrender doesn’t matter. They will b separated from Pak in coming days.Manas Sarkar

“We will arrange employment for you. Nobody will be allowed to destroy peace in the province,” he said.

Balochistan is the largest of Pakistan’s four provinces, but its roughly seven million inhabitants have long complained they do not receive a fair share of its gas and mineral wealth.

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