Jamat-ul Ahrar, New Name for Pakistani Taliban Barbarians

[SEE:   Pakistani Taliban Slaughter 100+ Schoolchildren In Peshawar ]

Ideological purification: Understanding the TTP split

dawn

Muhammad Amir Rana

Khorasani  Jamatul Ahrar
Omar Khalid Khorasani is seen in the centre during an interview in Mohmand tribal region on June 2, 2011. —Reuters photo

There is nothing new or surprising in the news of a split among ranks of the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), as it had been in the process since November last year, when TTP’s head Hakimullah Mehsud was killed in a drone attack.

While many see this split as a major blow to the terrorists’ umbrella organisation, it is worrisome that some relatively more brutal factions of the group are reorganising themselves.

The chance that this split will affect the existing militant landscape in the region is small.

The news indicates, in fact, that certain terrorist groups are in a process of transformation and are absorbing influences of newly emerging terrorist organisations like the Islamic State (previously ISIS, now IS).

The new influences and inspirations are causing ideological purification within terrorist organisations.

The newly established group Jamatul Ahrar, and its goals and objectives suggest that it is inspired by the achievements of the IS.

According to media reports, the group is the brainchild of Omar Khalid Khorasani — an ambitious Taliban commander and a member of TTP Shura who was not happy with peace talks between Taliban and the government.

Transformations and ideological purifications among terrorist groups usually entail a process of abrasion, which sometime goes deep, but should not be regarded as destruction.

Transformations do not make terrorist groups weaker.

Rather, they provide new ideological strengths, which help terrorists restructure their groups and revamp their operational strategies. When Ahrar claimed that the TTP now belonged to them, they meant to say that they had substituted the older organisational and operational formations with new ones.

Terrorist movements have passed through many transformations during the last one decade.

Much has been written about how Kashmir-based militant groups and sectarian groups in Pakistan came under al Qaeda’s ideological influence, which transformed major segments of these groups.

There were almost similar reasons behind the confrontation between the Taliban commanders Abdullah Mehsud and Baitullah Mehsud in 2004.

Abdullah wanted to speed up terrorist operations in Afghanistan, but Baitullah had come up with new ideological motives. While he did not object to Pakistani Taliban extending over help to their Afghan counterparts in Afghanistan, he stressed upon establishing the rule of Shariah in whatever tribal areas inside Pakistan were under Taliban control.

Under the influence of the Arabs and Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU), Baitullah also developed differences with Waziri militant commanders.

In the subsequent years, differences between Hakimullah Mehsud and Waliur Rehman Mehsud were primary of operational nature, but Waliur Rehman was not happy with the increasing sectarian tendencies in TTP.

When ideological transformations occurred across Pakistani militant groups within the broader concept of an Islamic state, it gradually ‘purified’ their objectives and evolved different trends among them.

Now, Pakistan has militant groups with interests ranging widely from tribal and nationalist ambitions to sectarian, regional and even global ones. There is a lot of diversity in these groups.

Operation Zarb-e-Azb in North Waziristan appears to be one of the major reasons behind new developments within the TTP.

As the military operation uprooted militants from their safe heavens and dispersed them, many militant commanders and groups looked confused as to how to respond to this situation, particularly in absence of an agreed-upon leadership.

TTP already had cracks, and it appeared that two Mehsud factions were fighting with each other over the issue of leadership and resource distributions.

One of these groups was the Khorasani group.

Omar Khorasani was not happy with the infighting among militants. He contested Fazlullah’s leadership, had reservations on his ideological vision and believed that the latter was focused too narrowly on his native region (Swat), which damaged the operational effectiveness of the TTP across the country.

Khorasani aspires to make his group part of a broader Khorasan movement, which he believes will bring global change and help establish the Caliphate system in the world.

The emergence of the IS also influenced some TTP and other militant commanders to revamp their movement and to revisit their strategies, capacities and operational targets.

The Khorasani group has been under the influence of al Qaeda, which unlike IS, does not hold any territory. Al Qaeda is an underground organisation that operates through its affiliates, which can intensify conflicts in certain regions; but it is not capable of leading the movements on the ground. Even on an operational front, al Qaeda depends on terrorist attacks and cannot develop and lead a force like IS.

The IS is inspiring more groups other than just Pakistani militants. Boko Haram and other terrorists groups that emerged after 9/11 have also pledged allegiance to this new movement.

Though the chances that groups like Jamatul Ahrar will announce allegiance to IS are few, it is safe to say that they are getting inspired by this new entity.

With al Qaeda getting weaker in the region, these groups may imitate the operational tactics of IS in the near future.

Every Drone Assassination Kills 28 Civilians

It takes 28 civilian lives to kill a single terrorist leader – UK human rights group

Russia-Today

https://i1.wp.com/www.newyorker.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/borowitz-drones.jpg

A U.S. Air Force MQ-1 Predator, unmanned aerial vehicle (Reuters / U.S. Air Force)

 

Eliminating a specific terrorist leader is a ‘targeted killing’ according to the US. However, Britain’s Reprieve human-rights group calculated that it takes about 28 innocent lives to take out a single terrorist leader, often with multiple drone strikes.

The UK human-rights group gave The Guardian the latest statistics (November 24) compiled by the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, on collateral damage from American drone strikes in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Somalia and Yemen.

The statistics are the most striking in 10 years: attempts to kill 41 terrorist leaders resulted in the deaths of an estimated 1,147 people, the vast majority – civilians and families.

“Drone strikes have been sold to the American public on the claim that they’re ‘precise’. But they are only as precise as the intelligence that feeds them. There is nothing precise about intelligence that results in the deaths of 28 unknown people, including women and children, for every ‘bad guy’ the US goes after,” said Jennifer Gibson, who headed Reprieve’s study.

Over the decade of ever-intensifying drone strikes in countries Washington has never actually declared war on, thousands of civilians have been killed – something the US has consistently denied.

“The only people we fire a drone at are confirmed terrorist targets at the highest level, after a great deal of vetting that takes a long period of time. We don’t just fire a drone at somebody and think they’re a terrorist,” The Guardian cited the US Secretary of State John Kerry as saying at a BBC forum in 2013.

Yet the statistics speak for themselves: it takes dozens, sometimes hundreds of lives to eliminate a single Al-Qaeda or Taliban warlord.

Over the last eight years there have been several attempts to eliminate an Al-Qaeda leader called Ayman Zawahiri. Drones have proved ineffective – the man is still alive. In two known attempts, in 2006, as many as 76 children and 29 adults were killed.

If Zawahiri’s name sounds familiar to some Americans, this definitely cannot be said about Qari Hussain, a former deputy commander of the Pakistani Taliban.

Supporters of the Difa-e-Pakistan Council, an Islamic organization, burn a U.S. flag as they shout slogans during a protest against U.S. drone attacks in the Pakistani tribal region, in Karachi November 8, 2013 (Reuters / Athar Hussain)

Supporters of the Difa-e-Pakistan Council, an Islamic organization, burn a U.S. flag as they shout slogans during a protest against U.S. drone attacks in the Pakistani tribal region, in Karachi November 8, 2013 (Reuters / Athar Hussain)

In 2008-2010 there were four attempts to get this man before missiles from an American drone killed him. But there was collateral damage: the US drones accidentally killed 128 people, including 13 children.

Most of the terror suspects were targeted in Pakistan, where a drone hunt after 24 terrorist leaders resulted in the deaths of 874 people, 142 of them children. The mission registered only six successful strikes.

This makes the terrorist/civilian drone death ratio in Pakistan as high as 1:36.

In Yemen, 273 people were killed (including at least seven children) in drone airstrikes targeting 17 terror suspects (terrorist/civilian death ratio 1:16).

However, 41 terrorist deaths claimed can’t actually be confirmed. Some have apparently been proclaimed dead twice, some have disappeared from American intelligence radar, and also identities have been mistaken. Others were even found dead under circumstances different from drone strikes.

There were 33 confirmed drone kills of the named targets, yet 947 people died in the attacks.

The statistics presented by Reprieve don’t cover other types of American drone strikes. These are the so-called ‘signature strikes’ against groups of people whose activities appeared to be ‘suspicious.’

The usually conservative US Council on Foreign Relations think tank assesses that in Afghanistan and Iraq, alone, some 500 drone ‘signature airstrikes’ have killed 3,674 people.

All CIA or Joint Special Operations Command drone strike operations are conducted in strict secrecy. Any information that is leaked is done so anonymously. So the data compiled by Reprieve is far from being complete.

“President Obama needs to be straight with the American people about the human cost of this program,” Reprieve’s Jennifer Gibson told The Guardian. “If even his government doesn’t know who is filling the body bags every time a strike goes wrong, his claims that this is a precise program look like nonsense, and the risk that it is in fact making us less safe looks all too real,” Gibson said.

Another Infamous Pakistani Militant Is Killed for the Second Time

[EXPOSING AMERICAN FRAUD]

[Another Taliban leader killed for the second time (SEE: 56 killed in shelling by fighter aircraft, helicopters ).  The continual repetition of this demonstrated pattern of the alleged re-killing of famous militants, either confirms the total and complete unreliability of those Pak spies who identify drone victims for the Western press, or else it confirms consistent Pentagon lying about the alleged “successes” of its drone murder program.  The Pentagon never really knows for sure “who” it kills in these strikes, or whether any militants were killed at all in the isolated mountains, even though nearly every publicized strike is linked with a known militant name.  The sheer number of the drone murders -vs- the limited number of known militant names in Pakistan, necessitates the re-running of the names of the alleged victims.]   

Top Pakistan Taliban commander Asmatullah Shaheen ‘shot dead

BBC

File photo of Asmatullah Shaheen Bhittani Shaheen was driving in North Waziristan when he was attacked, reports said

A senior Pakistani Taliban commander has been shot dead in a militant stronghold near the Afghan border, security sources and relatives say.

Asmatullah Shaheen was ambushed as he drove through a village near Miranshah in North Waziristan, reports said. Two others in the vehicle also died.

It is unclear who killed them. There has been no word from the militants.

Shaheen was briefly the Pakistani Taliban interim leader after its chief Hakimullah Mehsud was killed last year.

Asmatullah Shaheen, who came from the small Bhittani tribe, shot to prominence in December 2011 when his men kidnapped and killed about 15 security force personnel.

The BBC’s M Ilyas Khan in Islamabad says he is believed to have depended on the much larger Mehsud tribe for his clout in militant circles.

Proof That Pak Army Picks CIA Drone Targets In FATA

[The CIA has helped the ISI to “disappear” one of the pesky “Adiala 11″ (SEE:  The “Adiala 11″ Disappeared Were Suspects in GHQ Bombing and Musharraf Assassination Attempt).  All of the suspects in the GHQ assault were members of the “Amjad Farooqi Cell,” (SEE:  Paramilitary Pretense, Who Controls the Predators? ), named after the top dog in Lashkar e-Jhangvi, the Punjabi root of the terrorist vine which leads back to the Army and to Special Forces commando Ilyas Kashmiri (who was allegedly killed near the site of this latest drone attack). The reported victims of CIA murders have a way of reappearing again, whenever the agency needs them in new hot spots.  We have no ability to determine who dies in these drone attacks, or even if anybody dies at all.  If there are no recognizable photos to document a celebrated terrorist leader’s demise, then it is wise to question the validity of first press reports.

The Pak Army’s publicity apparatus and “iron fist” are very effective at dominating public opinion.  Wake-up, Imran Kahn!  The culprits behind CIA drone deaths work from offices in Rawalpindi, as well as in Kabul.  The first step towards ending drone deaths is to put an end to the official lie which denies Army complicity in drone deaths.]        

Militant involved in GHQ attack injured in drone attack

the news pak 
PESHAWAR: Two militants, including an accused linked with attack on Pakistan Army headquarters in Rawalpindi, were also injured in the US drone attack that targeted a compound in Miranshah town of North Waziristan.According to sources, Aslam alias Yaseen is linked with attacks on General Headquarters (GHQ) and another attack on the naval base in Karachi.The sources further said that three militants were killed in the drone strike. Two militants were from Punjab.

They said that the injured militants have been taken to hospital. The militants were fighting in Afghanistan, the sources claimed.

The militants were living in the attacked compound for four months, the sources added.

CIA Kills Jalaluddin’s Son Nasiruddin in Islamabad, Another Taliban Who Sought Peace

[This marks the beginning of Fazlullah’s reign of terror at the helm of the TTP and the re-blossoming of the spy wars in KP.  It is unknown what relationship new TTP deputy, Khalid Haqqani, has to Jalaluddin, but the removal of Naseer-uddin and the simultaneous rise of Khalid within the Haqqani clan cannot be coincidental.

Nasiruddin supported pursuing peace talks with both the Afghan and Pakistani governments.  In his position as an intermediary between  the Haqqani network and its generous Gulf donors, he made regular trips to the Gulf, where he is alleged to have made contact with Tayeb Agha, who runs the office of the “Taliban Emirate” in Doha (SEE:  Taliban group share peace talks draft with Pakistan).  This means that he has been tainted by contact with the Qatari pig, which immediately draws a line between him and the Saudis.] 

“There are reports that Nasiruddin and other senior Haqqani leaders also maintain residences in the immediate vicinity of ISI headquarters in Islamabad.”  He was no doubt killed in the vicinity of ISI HQ in Islamabad.

[Just down the road from ISI HQ, is Bhara Kahu, the spot where he was alleged to have been killed, according to Afghan Taliban spokesman.]

https://i2.wp.com/s2.firstpost.in/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Pakistan-Haqqani-murder-ap.jpg

A photographer takes picture of the spot where Nasiruddin Haqqani, a senior leader of the feared militant Haqqani network, was assassinated. AP
A photographer takes picture of the spot where Nasiruddin Haqqani, a senior leader of the feared militant Haqqani network, was assassinated. APRead more at: http://www.firstpost.com/world/pak-haqqani-chiefs-son-nasiruddin-gunned-down-in-islamabad-1223107.html?utm_source=ref_article

ارشيف


Haqqani’s son murdered in Islamabad

Pajhwok

KABUL (PAN): A son of the Haqqani Network’s leader has been shot dead by unidentified gunmen in Pakistan’s capital Islamabad, a militant leader said on Monday.

Jalaluddin Haqqani’s son, Dr. Nasiruddin Haqqani, was gunned down in front of his residence in Islamabad last night, a senior Taliban leader confided to Pajhwok Afghan News.

There was no immediate of claim of responsibility for the murder that happened in the Barakau area Barakau area, the source said, adding the attackers managed to escape on a motorbike.

Dr Nasir came under attack while returning home from a mosque. His body has been dispatched to Miranshah for burial, scheduled later in the day.

He was in charge of political affairs of the militant outfit that has been engaged in an armed struggle against US-led foreign troops in Afghanistan.

In August 2012, another son of the top insurgent leader, Badruddin Haqqani, was killed in a US drone strike in Pakistan’s northwestern tribal region of North Waziristan.

Regarded as a fierce commander of the network, Badruddin was struck with missiles from the CIA-operated pilotless aircraft while leaving his hideout in Shawal Valley.

Pakistan Forced To Trade American Agent Hakeemullah For Even Worse US/Saudi Agent Fazlullah

[Sad to admit the hard facts about Pakistan, but militant/terrorist leaders tend to tell the truth more often there than does the actual government leaders do.  I can find no fault with the following TTP claims.  The first quotes are from the Dawn article on Fazlullah, blaming the Pak govt. for killing Hakeemullah.]

“Pakistani rulers are slaves of the Americans and Pakistan is a US colony. The rulers are keeping the people in the dark and deceiving the nation by speaking about talks while conspiring with the US to harm the Taliban.”

The TTP holds “Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif responsible for the death of Hakeemullah. `He bargained and sold out Hakeemullah to the Americans and we hold Nawaz Sharif and his Pakistan Muslim League responsible for his death.”

“We are one hundred percent sure that Pakistan fully supports the United States in its drone strikes.”

[No matter what the lying Pakistani or Western press says to the contrary—There is NO DAYLIGHT between the Pakistani and American militaries on the drone assassination program, a hard fact that the militants have always understood.  All of this nonsense about “good” or “bad Taliban” is tabloid journalism, intended to mislead the viewing or reading public.  Consider the words of the most disputed “good/bad Taliban,” before he too was murdered by one of Obama/Kayani’s drones, Mullah Nazir had the following to say:

[SEE: Paramilitary Pretense, Who Controls the Predators?]

“Pakistan has misled the common population that America carries out these attacks and we cannot do anything to stop them. All the spies that we have caught turned out to be employees of Pakistan. The location-tracking SIMs that they use had been provided by Pakistan. We have also released their video clips. The spyware and intelligence is fully associated with the Army. A couple of days ago, an American CIA officer confessed that Pakistan’s airbases are being used for these attacks and that Pakistan itself is involved in them. They have even threatened us themselves that it is we who are striking you and that either you should renounce Jihad or we would attack. The assertion that America is behind this and we are helpless is only meant to deceive the public. All these attacks that have happened and are still happening are the work of Pakistan.”

“Pakistan serves America. 70% of the assistance America receives is provided by Pakistan. They have martyred our Mujahid brothers; those of them who were leading us and were our elders. Whenever we raise our head, Pakistan pursues us. Thus we are compelled to war Pakistan. It is not because India or Russia has bribed us…not at all…rather, we have been compelled to do so. Pakistan does not leave us alone.”

“Actually, it is the ISI that executes operations at mosques, not the Mujahideen. They are enemies to us and so they scare people about us being thugs and things like that. We are Mujahideen and we never carry out martyrdom operations in the vicinity of Muslims. It is the Army upon which we execute such operations. The Army is our target because it has aided the Americans. We do carry out martyrdom operations throughout Pakistan but we renounce and condemn those of them in mosques and marketplaces. It is our enemy that does it.”

[Before the drone campaign blossomed under Obama, we have the following testimony on Pakistani Army culpability from an anonymous Mehsud militant.]

[Fazlullah has promised to wage an intensive bombing campaign across Punjab in revenge for Hakeemullah’s murder, which is anticipated to force the Army’s hand,  achieving the long-sought North Waziristan offensive that the Pentagon has been screaming for (SEE:  ‘Red rag to a bull': New TTP chief could push army to military action).  Fazlullah is the CIA/Saudi agent who started a war against the Pak Army in Swat and Bajaur, before the Army drove him into Afghanistan’s Nuristan/Logar region.  He has maintained his attacks upon the Army from the sanctuary there.  Having him in charge of the TTP is the CIA’s “wet dream” come true.  There will be no drone attacks upon Fazlullah.  While Fazlullah was in control in Swat, there were zero drone assassinations there, after the single disastrous attempt to kill Ayman Zawahiri there in 2006, blowing-up a religious seminary in Chenagai village, claiming the lives of 82 boys and their teachers.

Whoever was the traitor that planted the CIA tracking chip on Hakeemullah, effectively silencing the new govt attempts to negotiate peace, did a very great disservice to his country.  The Pakistani people just jumped from the frying pan right into the middle of the fire.]

fazlullah

Ruthless Fazlullah is new Taliban chief

dawn
By Sailab Mehsud and Pazir Gul

MIRAMSHAH, Nov 7: The outlawed Tehreek-iTaliban Pakistan chose on Thursday Mullah Fazlullah, a fugitive militant ensconced in Afghanistan, as its new leader.

The umbrella organisation representing dozens of militant groups vowed to take revenge from Pakistani rulers and security forces f or the killing of its leader Hakeemullah Mehsud in a drone attack last week.

Miramshah, the headquarters of North Waziristan, reverberated with gunfire in celebration after the announcement of the selection of the 39-year-old militant leader from Swat, who ruled the northern district for two years before he was driven out in a military operation in 2009.

He had entered into a peace deal with the then ruling Awami National Party in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa through his father-in-law Maulana Sufi Muhammad, leading to enforcement of the Nizam-i-Adl Regulation in 2009. But the deal collapsed when militants refused to lay down arms and a full-fledged military operation was launched in Swat.

According to intelligence officials, Fazlullah, who was known as Radio Mullah for his use of FM frequencies to broadcast sermons to the people of Swat, was in Afghanistan`s eastern Nuristan province from where his fighters carried out raids on Pakistani border posts.

The Fazlullah group had accepted responsibility for a roadside bombing in Upper Dir that killed Maj Gen Sanaullah Niazi and another officer in mid-September this year and subsequently released a video of the attack.

The TTP announced that its shura had also chosen Sheikh Khalid Haqqani, a little known militant leaderfrom Swabi, as its deputy leader, effectively shifting the militant leadership from the tribal region to the settled districts of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

In a recent video message, Khalid Haqqani outlined TTP`s global jihad mission and said: `Our ongoing struggle is not restricted to the boundaries of Pakistan but connected to all [jihadi] movements in different regions of the world.

`Now we have people at the helm in the TTP who are opposed to talks with the government. This indicates the mood within the TTP,` a senior security official said.

`Not that there has ever been any optimism before, but this development changes the entire equation,` he said.

`The leadership has passed on from one set of radicals to another. They are all hardliners.

But some former security officials said the appointment of leaders from outside the tribal region indicated a rift between rival groups within the TTP vying for the top slot.

`The Mehsuds wouldn`t let the leadership go away from TTP`s birthplace,` former intelligence officer retired Brig Asad Munir said.

`Fazlullah and Khalid Haqqani have been brought in to avert a rift between rival Mehsud groups,` he said.

But the leader of TTP executive shura, Asmatullah Shaheen Bhittani, said at a news conference in Miramshah that the unanimous election of the new leaders disproved the `propaganda` about a rift within the TTP.

He also threatened that the `federal government and Punjab and other provinces and security forces will be our target`.

He held Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif responsible for the death of Hakeemullah. `He bargained and sold out Hakeemullah to the Americans and we hold Nawaz Sharif and his Pakistan Muslim League responsible for his death, he said.

Bhittani said the militants would expand their activities to Punjab which so far has largely remained peaceful. `We are not politicians who issue hollow threats.

Our revenge from Punjab, the federal government and the security forces will be exemplary,` he said whiletalking to Dawn.

`But we assure the people that they would not be harmed.

However, the assurance is likely to be believed only by a few people as the government says about 50,000 people have lost their lives in terrorist attacks in more than a decade of militant activities in the country.

Bhittani accused the government of pursuing a dual policy. `Pakistani rulers are slaves of the Americans and Pakistan is a US colony. The rulers are keeping the people in the dark and deceiving the nation by speaking about talks while conspiring with the US to harm the Taliban,` he alleged.

(According to news agencies, Asmatullah Shaheen said at the press conference that the TTP would not negotiate with the government `until it announces the complete enforcement of sharia`.

`There will be no more talks as Mullah Fazlullah is already against negotiations with the Pakistan government,` Taliban spokesman Shahidullah Shahid said.

`We are one hundred percent sure that Pakistan fully supports the United States in its drone strikes,` he said.

Fazlullah opposes polio vaccinations and ordered closure of girls` schools.)

The Murdering Little Bastard Hakeemullah, Who Was Killed for Seeking Peace With Pakistan

Hakimullah Mehsud dead

US could not confirm death of Hakimullah: State Department

the news pak

The State Department said Hakimullah was responsible for a failed May 2010 attempt to detonate a car bomb in New York’s Times Square besides several key incidents.

The spokesman said the State Department of US could not confirm the death of Mehsud.

Dialogues with Pakistan on bilateral relations were continue, the spokesman further said.

AFP Adds: The United States Monday admitted to “tensions” and occasional “misunderstandings” in its relations with Pakistan, but implicitly defended the killing of TTP chief Hakimullah Mehsud.

The government in Islamabad reacted angrily to the attack on Hakimullah Mehsud, saying it would scuttle its peace talks with the group.

“There inevitably will be some tensions and occasional misunderstandings between our two countries,” White House spokesman Jay Carney said.

“We hope to continue to make progress in the relationship, and we continue to seek ways for our countries to cooperate on the entire range of shared interests that we have, from economic to security issues.”

Carney would not confirm the drone strike that killed Mehsud, in line with normal practice in such attacks, but he said the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) leader had a long list of extremist credentials, including a failed bombing in Times Square, New York, in 2010.

Carney charged that Mehsud and other TTP leaders had “publicly vowed to continue targeting the United States and Americans.”

Mehsud was also wanted in connection with the killings of seven Americans at a US base in Khost province, Afghanistan.