ThereAreNoSunglasses

American Resistance To Empire

Does Donald Trump Want Out?

Donald Trump to America: Please impeach me

This president is all but shouting ‘get me out of here.’ We should help.

 

 

Donald Trump is doing an excellent impression of a president who desperately wishes to be impeached. Congress should grant that wish, or figure out an even quicker way to bring this tragicomedy to its inevitable end. If there aren’t enough smoking guns quite yet, just wait a day or two. They’re coming at us faster than rounds from a Kalashnikov on full auto.

Could Trump’s signals be any more clear? He’s not even having fun. “No politician in history, and I say this with great surety, has been treated worse or more unfairly,” Trump said at the Coast Guard Academy commencement. That was just a few hours before Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein named former FBI director Robert Mueller as a special counsel to oversee the FBI’s Russia investigation, and a day before Trump tweeted that “this is the single greatest witch hunt of a politician in American history!”

Suffice it to say the job is only going to get less fun.

Given all we know about Trump himself — the disturbing real time glimpses into his mind via Twitter; his Tourette-like tendency to blurt out exactly what most presidents would know they shouldn’t; his relentless ignorance of policy, government and our nation’s founding principles — we shouldn’t be shocked by recent developments.

No one but a person hunting for an escape hatch would admit in a national TV interview that he was thinking about the “made-up” Russia story when he fired FBI Director James Comey; would ask Comey to stop investigating former national security adviser Mike Flynn’s contacts with Russia, possibly violating his oath of office; and would ask Comey to pledge loyalty to him, even though FBI directors have 10-year terms precisely so they can operate independently of presidents.

Only a president eyeing the door would summon the ghost of Richard Nixon by firing Comey and then tweeting: “James Comey better hope that there are no ‘tapes’ of our conversations before he starts leaking to the press!” Only someone intent on getting ousted would fire Comey over Russia and then the very next day meet with top Russian officials in the Oval Office under a painting of George Washington, let their photographer in while barring the U.S. press, share with them highly classified information about ISIS, describe Comey to them as a “nut job,” and confide that firing him took the pressure off. (Each part of that sentence beggars belief.)

The latest tough stuff, from Trump’s perspective, is the foreign tour he’s on. “Mr. Trump, a confirmed homebody, has expressed dread about the trip,” The New York Times reported before he left Friday.

And who can blame him? The itinerary started with Saudi Arabia, a hotbed of, you know, the kind of people he’s trying to keep out of the USA, followed by Israel, reportedly the source of the top-secret Islamic State of Iraq and Syrian intelligence that Trump spilled to the Russians. Trump will be in Rome to see Pope Francis, who has indicated that Trump is not one of his favorites. The president has never had much nice to say about NATO, its member nations or their leaders, but he’ll be in Brussels to meet with them, too.

Not fun! No wonder Trump decamps nearly every weekend to his own golf clubs and resorts and luxury digs. Why does he hate Washington? Has he ever even laid eyes on Camp David?

The president needs an exit strategy that makes him look like a winner. He doesn’t deserve one; in fact, he may well turn out to deserve impeachment. But that would make him a loser and he’d fight it to the end, and the end would be a long time coming.

What would entice him to leave soon? Trump is not going to turn into a world-class philanthropist (a course I once envisioned for Mitt Romney). And Trump won’t become head of a university (been there, done that, and it wasn’t pretty). Nor can I see him growing a beard (Al Gore), promoting Viagra (Bob Dole) or taking up painting (George W. Bush). And I’d be shocked if Trump decided to devote his post-presidency to, say, fighting gerrymandering or poverty (Barack Obama).

Only one suitable option comes to mind: Somebody sell this man a TV network. He seemed to be musing about Trump TV before a comet struck Earth and he won the presidency. It’s been done — think Gore and Current TV. Trump TV would, of course, be much more yuge and would never, not ever, dare to morph into Al-Jazeera America or anything with a name like that.

Trump could brag about its large size and amazingly great American greatness. He could hire as many beautiful women as he wanted, present whatever content he wanted, star in as many shows as he wanted, and do it all right from Mar-a-Lago or Trump Tower. He’d never have to leave home.

Tom Nichols, a Russian expert and professor at the Naval War College, says it’s dangerous that a “raw feed” of Trump’s thoughts, emotions and reactions to stress is available to foreign intelligence analysts worldwide on Twitter. For better or worse, all of that is also available to we, the people. And to me the message, amplified by countless interviews, news conferences and leaks from panicked associates, is clear: “Get me out of here.”

Jill Lawrence is the commentary editor of USA TODAY and author of The Art of the Political Deal: How Congress Beat the Odds and Broke Through Gridlock. Follow her on Twitter: @JillDLawrence

Major Terror Attack In Manchester, England…Bomb Kills 22+ At American Singer’s Concert

Suicide bomber kills at least 22, including children, at Ariana Grande concert in Britain

 

By Michael Holden and Andrew Yates | MANCHESTER, England

MANCHESTER, England At least 22 people, including some children, were killed and 59 were wounded when a suicide bomber struck as thousands of fans streamed out of a concert by U.S. singer Ariana Grande in the English city of Manchester on Monday.

Prime Minister Theresa May called an emergency meeting with intelligence chiefs on the deadliest militant assault in Britain since four British Muslims killed 52 people in suicide bombings on London’s transport system in July 2005.

Witnesses related the horror of the blast which prompted a stampede just as the concert ended at Europe’s largest indoor arena.

“We ran and people were screaming around us and pushing on the stairs to go outside and people were falling down, girls were crying, and we saw these women being treated by paramedics having open wounds on their legs … it was just chaos,” said Sebastian Diaz, 19.

“It was literally just a minute after it ended, the lights came on and the bomb went off,” Diaz said.

U.S. President Donald Trump described the attack as the work of “evil losers”. German Chancellor Angela Merkel said it “will only strengthen our resolve to…work together with our British friends against those who plan and carry out such inhumane deeds.”

Police said the attacker detonated the explosives shortly after 10:33 pm at Manchester Arena, which has the capacity to hold 21,000 people. Children were among the dead, police said.

“We believe, at this stage, the attack last night was conducted by one man,” Manchester Chief Constable Ian Hopkins told reporters. “The priority is to establish whether he was acting alone or as part of a network.

He declined to answer questions on the bomber’s identity.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan said more police had been ordered onto the streets of the British capital. London’s Victoria coach station was briefly closed after discovery of a suspect package.

A source with knowledge of the situation said the bomber’s explosives were packed with metal and bolts. At least 19 of those wounded were in a critical condition, the source said.

A video posted on Twitter showed fans, many of them young, screaming and running from the venue. Dozens of parents frantically searched for their children, posting photos and pleading for information on social media.

“We were making our way out and when we were right by the door there was a massive explosion and everybody was screaming,” concert-goer Catherine Macfarlane told Reuters.

“It was a huge explosion – you could feel it in your chest.”

Ariana Grande, 23, whose concerts attract a very large proportion of young women and girls, said on Twitter: “broken. from the bottom of my heart, i am so so sorry. i don’t have words.” May, who faces an election in two-and-a-half weeks, said her thoughts were with the victims and their families. She and Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of the opposition Labour Party, agreed to suspend campaigning ahead of the June 8 election.

“We are working to establish the full details of what is being treated by the police as an appalling terrorist attack,” May said in a statement.

SUICIDE BOMBER?

There was no immediate claim of responsibility, but U.S. officials drew parallels to the coordinated attacks in November 2015 by Islamist militants on the Bataclan concert hall and other sites in Paris, which claimed about 130 lives.

High profile attacks, including in Paris, Nice, Brussels, St Petersburg, Berlin and London, have shocked Europeans who are already anxious over security challenges from mass immigration, open borders and pockets of Islamist radicalism.

“It clearly bears the hallmark of Daesh (Islamic State),” said former French intelligence agent Claude Moniquet, now a Brussels-based security consultant, “because Ariana Grande is a young singer who attracts a very young audience, teenagers.

“So very clearly the aim was to do as much harm as possible, to shock British society as much as possible.”

Islamic State supporters took to social media to celebrate the blast and some encouraged similar attacks elsewhere. [L8N1IP096]

Britain is on its second-highest alert level of “severe”, meaning an attack by militants is considered highly likely.

British counter-terrorism police have said they are making on average an arrest every day in connection with suspected terrorism.

In March, a British-born convert to Islam ploughed a car into pedestrians on London’s Westminster Bridge, killing four people before stabbing to death a police officer who was on the grounds of parliament. The man was shot dead at the scene.

In 2015, Pakistani student Abid Naseer was convicted in a U.S. court of conspiring with al Qaeda to blow up the Arndale shopping center in the center of Manchester in April 2009.

PARENTS’ ANGUISH

Desperate parents and friends used social media to search for loved ones who attended Monday’s concert while the wounded were being treated at six hospitals across Manchester.

“Everyone pls share this, my little sister Emma was at the Ari concert tonight in #Manchester and she isn’t answering her phone, pls help me,” said one message posted alongside a picture of a blonde girl with flowers in her hair.

Paula Robinson, 48, from West Dalton about 40 miles east of Manchester, said she was at the train station next to the arena with her husband when she felt the explosion and saw dozens of teenage girls screaming and running away from arena.

“We ran out,” Robinson told Reuters. “It was literally seconds after the explosion. I got the teens to run with me.”

Robinson took dozens of teenage girls to the nearby Holiday Inn Express hotel and tweeted out her phone number to worried parents, telling them to meet her there. She said her phone had not stopped ringing since her tweet.

“Parents were frantic running about trying to get to their children,” she said. “There were lots of lots children at Holiday Inn.”

For a graphic showing where the blast hit, click: tmsnrt.rs/2rbQAay

(Additional Reporting by Alistair Smout, Kate Holton, David Milliken, Elizabeth Piper, Paul Sandle and Costas Pitas in LONDON, Mark Hosenball in LOS ANGELES, John Walcott in WASHINGTON, D.C., Leela de Kretser in NEW YORK, Mostafa Hashem in CAIRO, and Ben Blanchard in BEIJING; Writing by Guy Faulconbridge and Nick Tattersall; Editing by Ralph Boulton)

 

779 Sunni Inmates At Gitmo, Only 3 Shiite (Iranian) Prisoners Ever Held There

Iranian detainees at Guantanamo Bay

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The United States Department of Defense acknowledges holding 3 Iranian captives in Guantanamo.[1] A total of 779 captives have been held in extrajudicial detention in the Guantanamo Bay detention camps, in Cuba since the camps opened on January 11, 2002 The camp population peaked in 2004 at approximately 660. Only nineteen new captives, all “high value detainees” have been transferred there since the United States Supreme Court‘s ruling in Rasul v. Bush. As of July 2012 the camp population stands at approximately 168.

Iranian captives acknowledged by the DoD

4 Sunni Muslim Groups Responsible for 66% of All 17,958 Terror Killings in 2013

 

By Patrick Goodenough


Smoke billows from a burning car moments after Islamist terrorists carried out a suicide bombing attack targeting the convoy of an Egyptian government minister in Cairo in September 2013. (AP Photo/Ahmed Soliman, File)

(CNSNews.com) – The number of people killed by terrorists worldwide in 2013 rose by 60 percent compared to the previous year – from 11,133 to 17,958 – with four Sunni Muslim extremist groups responsible for two-thirds of all fatalities, according to a comprehensive annual study.Eighty-two percent of fatalities occurred in just five countries – Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nigeria and Syria, although the number of countries that experienced more than 50 terror-related deaths also rose – to 24, compared with 15 the previous year.

Among the many findings in the new Global Terrorism Index, a project of the nonprofit Institute for Economics and Peace, is one that calls into question claims that poverty is a key driver of terrorism.

“One of the most important findings in this report is that there is not a strong statistical link between poverty and terrorism,” it says. “Many people who join terrorist groups in wealthy countries are well educated and come from middle class families.”

“Other measures which didn’t correlate include life expectancy, mean years of schooling and economic factors such as GDP growth.”

Socio-economic, governance and attitudinal variables that showed the most significant correlation with terrorism were political stability, intergroup cohesion and legitimacy of the state.

The report also found that “religion” as a driving ideology for terrorism has jumped significantly in the last five years, and accounts for most of the terror activity in the Middle East and North Africa, South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa.

As a driver for terrorist groups, religion far outstrips “politics,” which tends to dominate attacks in the Western Hemisphere and is responsible for about half of them in Europe; and “national separatist” ideology, which accounts for the vast majority of attacks in Russia and former Soviet Union areas, and about half of attacks in Europe and about one-third in the Asia-Pacific.

“Over the last decade the increase in terrorism has been linked to radical Islamic groups whose violent theologies have been broadly taught,” said Steve Killelea, executive chairman of the Institute for Economics and Peace.

“To counteract these influences, moderate forms of Sunni theologies need to be championed by Sunni Muslim nations,” he said. “Given the theological nature of the problem it is difficult for outside actors to be influential.”

Four Sunni groups were responsible for 66 percent of all terror fatalities in 2013. In order of deadliness, they were the Taliban in Afghanistan and its Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) affiliate in neighboring Pakistan; al-Qaeda and its various affiliates; ISIS and its al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI) precursor; and Boko Haram in Nigeria.

Religion as a driving ideology for terrorism has dramatically increased since 2000, when nationalist separatist movements were more prominent. Political and national separatist movements are still significant in 2013 but have seen little change in activity over the period.

As expected, Iraq tops the new Global Terrorism Index (GTI), accounting for by far the largest number of terrorist deaths in the period under review – and that was even before the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS)’s surge in the country, which has escalated since last January.

Iraq recorded a 162 percent rise in fatalities, to 6,362, with ISIS responsible for 77 percent of the attacks that were claimed by any particular group.

Next up was Afghanistan, which recorded a 13 percent rise in terror fatalities in 2013, to 3,111. Of those, 75 percent were attributed to the Taliban, which killed almost 2,350 people in 2013.

In Pakistan, number three on the GTI, 2,345 people were killed in terror attacks in 2013, an increase of 37 percent. Many of the attacks were not claimed, but the TTP took responsibility for 49 percent of those that were claimed, accounting for almost 25 percent of fatalities.

Nigeria at number four saw 1,826 people killed. Seven groups claimed responsibility, but the vast majority of attacks were carried out by Boko Haram, which the report says is “one of the most deadly terrorist groups in the world with an average of close to eight deaths per terrorist attack.”

The descent of Africa’s most populous country has been especially marked over recent years. As a result of Boko Haram’s deadly campaign, Nigeria climbed to fourth place in this year’s GTI from seventh place in last year’s report and 12th the year before.

Syria is fifth on the new GTI, with 1,078 people killed in terror attack over the period in review, a jump from around 600 deaths the previous year. (The report differentiates between fatalities in terror attacks and “conventional warfare” deaths in the brutal civil war, but says the number of terror attacks may be underreported due to the conflict.)

Half of the terror attacks in Syria in 2013 were not claimed, but the al-Qaeda affiliate al-Nusra Front was responsible for more than 40 percent.

Rounding out the top 10 on the GTI were Somalia, India, the Philippines, Yemen and Thailand.

The index is calculated based on the number of terror attacks, the number of deaths, the number of injuries and the level of property damage. The indicators are used to create a weighted five-year average that takes into account the lasting effects of terrorism.

Patrick Goodenough
Patrick Goodenough
Spencer Journalism Fellow

European Parliament identifies Wahabi and Salafi roots of global terrorism


European Parliament identifies Wahabi and Salafi roots of global terrorism

 

 

It is not merely the faith or oil that flows out of Saudi Arabia. The oil-rich Arab state and its neighbours are busy financing Wahabi and Salafi militants across the globe.A recent report by the European Parliament reveals how Wahabi and Salafi groups based out of the Middle East are involved in the “support and supply of arms to rebel groups around the world.” The report, released in June 2013, was commissioned by European Parliament’s Directorate General for External Policies. The report warns about the Wahabi/Salafi organisations and claims that “no country in the Muslim world is safe from their operations … as they always aim to terrorise their opponents and arouse the admiration of their supporters.”

The nexus between Arab charities promoting Wahabi and Salafi traditions and the extremist Islamic movements has emerged as one of the major threats to people and governments across the globe. From Syria, Mali, Afghanistan and Pakistan to Indonesia in the East, a network of charities is funding militancy and mayhem to coerce Muslims of diverse traditions to conform to the Salafi and Wahabi traditions. The same networks have been equally destructive as they branch out of Muslim countries and attack targets in Europe and North America.

Despite the overt threats emerging from the oil-rich Arab states, governments across the globe continue to ignore the security imperative and instead are busy exploiting the oil-, and at time times, blood-soaked riches.

The European Parliament’s report though is a rare exception to the rule where in the past the western governments have let the oil executives influence their foreign offices. From the United States to Great Britain, western states have gone to great lengths to ignore the Arab charities financing the radical groups, some of whom have even targeted the West with deadly consequences.

While the recent report by the European Parliament documents the financial details connecting the Arab charities with extremists elsewhere, it is certainly not the first exposition of its kind. A 2006 report by the US Department of State titled, International Narcotics Control Strategy Report – Money Laundering and Financial Crimes, reported that “Saudi donors and unregulated charities have been a major source of financing to extremist and terrorist groups over the past 25 years.” One of the WikiLeaks documents, a cable from the US Consulate in Lahore also stated that “financial support estimated at nearly 100 million USD annually was making its way to Deobandi and Ahl-e-Hadith clerics in the region from ‘missionary’ and ‘Islamic charitable’ organisations in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates ostensibly with the direct support of those governments.”

The European Parliament’s report estimates that Saudi Arabia alone has spent over $10 billion to promote Wahabism through Saudi charitable foundations. The tiny, but very rich, state of Qatar is the new entrant to the game supporting militant franchises from Libya to Syria.

The linkage between Saudi-based charitable organisations and militants began in the late 70s in Pakistan. A network of charitable organisations was setup in Pakistan to provide the front for channeling billions of dollars to fight the Soviets in Afghanistan. Since then the militant networks have spread globally, emerging as a major threat to international security. Charlie Wilson’s War, a book by George Crile that was made into a movie, details the Saudi-militancy nexus as well as Ahmed Rashid’s Taliban.

While ordinary citizens in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and other countries have suffered the deadly consequences of militancy supported by the Wahabi and Salafi charitable organisations, the Saudi government had remained largely dormant. This changed in 2003 when militants attacked targets in Riyadh. Since then, the Saudi government has kept a close watch on the domestic affairs of charities, making it illegal to sponsor militancy, but the government has done precious little to curtail activities by Saudi charities abroad. In fact, evidence, as per the European Parliament’s report, suggests that Saudi and Qatar-based charities have been actively financing militants in Egypt, Syria, Libya, Mali, and Indonesia.

Pakistan has suffered tremendously over the past three decades from domestic and foreign inspired militancy. The Soviet invasion in Afghanistan and the US-backed Afghan militancy forced Pakistan into a civil war that has continued to date. The faltering Pakistani economy did not help. Successive governments have rushed to Saudi monarchs asking for loans and free oil in times of need. However, Saudi money comes bundled with Saudi propaganda and a license to convert Pakistanis to a more ‘puritan’, read Wahabi, version of Islam.

In late the 70s, Iranians also intensified their influence in Pakistan. While hardline Sunnis were being radicalised by the Wahabi influences from Saudi Arabia, Iranian influence on Pakistani Shias was also increasing. And whereas Pakistan did not need any further radicalization of its people, the Saudi-Iranian tussle spilled into the streets of Pakistan with devastating consequences for religious minorities and liberal streams of Sunni Islam.

At the same time, the economic collapse in Pakistan forced many to find jobs abroad. Millions of Pakistanis left for the Middle East, especially Saudi Arabia. While the remittances kept their families and the Pakistani government afloat, the migrant workers returned to Pakistan after being radicalised during their stay in Saudi. They became the brand ambassadors for the Saudi-inspired Wahabi flavours of Islam, thus expediting the pace of radicalisation in Pakistan.

Pakistan was equally vulnerable to foreign influences after the devastating earthquake in 2005 and floods in 2010 and 2011. The European Parliament’s report revealed that these disasters provided Saudi and other Arab charities to channel millions of dollars in aid, of which an unknown amount was used to fund militant organisations who have broadened their reach in Pakistan resulting in over 45,000 violent deaths in the past few years alone.

Pakistanis have a very strong spiritual link with Saudi Arabia. However, they are suffering for the unbound devotion to the oil-rich state, which has done a poor job of curbing the financial support for militancy in Pakistan. Seeing the plight of violence stricken Pakistanis, one hopes that Saudi charities could be more charitable.


Author Image

Murtaza Haider is a Toronto-based academic and the director of Regionomics.com.

He tweets @regionomics

Sunni Terrorism is Killing Internationally but America Blames Iran: Christians and Hezbollah

Sunni Terrorism is Killing Internationally but America Blames Iran: Christians and Hezbollah

 

Boutros Hussein, Chika Mori, and Lee Jay Walker

Modern Tokyo Times

https://i0.wp.com/moderntokyotimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/800px-Bilateral_Nuclear_Talks_-_Ernest_Moniz-John_Kerry-Mohammad_Javad_Zarif-Ali_Akbar_Salehi-3.jpg

President Donald Trump of America was elected based on promises over the internal economy and re-energizing the nation state by focusing on equal trade agreements that envisage greater protection for American workers. Sadly, it seems that in the realm of geopolitics, terrorism, and military issues, that the usual easy slogans are back in favor in order to appease Israel and Saudi Arabia respectively. Therefore, if events spiral out of control in the Ukraine, it appears that promises with solving the relationship with the Russian Federation may also be missed.

James Mattis, the US Defense Secretary, is citing Iran with being the “biggest state sponsor of terrorism.” Yet mentioning Bahrain, Lebanon, Syria, and Yemen, in relation to Iran being involved in terrorism is not only false, it denies the stable role of Iran in helping to defeat ISIS (Islamic State – IS) in Iraq and Syria. This, amazingly, includes Iran assisting America by stealth in Iraq because without Iran’s resolve – and the role of Shia militias – then the central government of Baghdad was threatened with being overrun by ISIS prior to the counterattack.

Equally, religious minorities, including Christians and Yazidis in Iraq, are threatened by the genocidal and enslaving tendencies of Sunni Islamists in this country based on endless atrocities by ISIS. Similarly, in Syria, the Shia force of Hezbollah is helping to protect Syrians of all faiths, irrespective if Christian, Druze, or Muslim. Likewise, the main Christian politician in Lebanon, Michel Aoun, is known to have good relations with Hezbollah.

Indeed, Sunni Islamic terrorism is responsible for September 11 in America just like the same ideology is spreading its barbaric tendencies in Europe. Maybe Mattis isn’t aware of the difference of geopolitics and international terrorism? After all, the terrorists of Al-Qaeda, Al-Shabaab, Al-Nusra, Boko Haram, ISIS, the Taliban, and a plethora of others, follow the same Sunni Islamic intrigues in line with the political ambitions of the Sunni Islamist Muslim Brotherhood. In other words, Africans, Asians, Europeans, and North Americans, are threatened solely by Sunni Islamic terrorism in countless nations. Also, in parts of some European cities, the reality of Sunni Islamization based on Gulf petrodollars and the policies of naïve politically correct liberals in Europe is altering the demographic and religious landscape.

ISIS to the anti-Shia state institutionalism of Saudi Arabia and other nations including Bahrain are fermenting sectarianism based on the endless persecution of Shia Muslims. Given this reality, the growth of Al-Qaeda (AQAP in Yemen) in Yemen and the growing tentacles of ISIS in this nation are based on the Sunni Muslim coalition under the leadership of Saudi Arabia. Therefore, the Shia in Yemen – and all forces opposed to the Saudi Arabia led coalition – face the triple forces of Sunni Islamic aggression, Western military arms boosting Saudi Arabia, and the wrath of bloodthirsty Sunni Islamist groups including AQAP and ISIS.

Mattis said, “We have seen their [Iran’s] misconduct, their misbehavior, from Lebanon and Syria to Bahrain and to Yemen and it’s got to be addressed at some point.”

Yet, this statement by Mattis seems more aimed at appeasing Israel and Saudi Arabia, rather than caring about the religious mosaic of the region and finding a space in order for Christians to survive throughout the Middle East. For example, in Syria, it is government forces and allies including Hezbollah that are enabling the Christians to survive the genocidal tendencies of ISIS and other Sunni Islamist sectarian terrorist forces. Likewise, Hezbollah and Christians in the Aoun camp in Lebanon – and at a local level based on the initiatives of Shia mosques and Christian churches – seek to maintain the religious mosaic of this nation.

His Eminence, Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah, an extremely powerful religious cleric in the movement of Hezbollah knows full well the real danger to the entire region. Nasrallah said, “I want to ask the Christians before the Muslims: You are seeing what is taking place in Syria. I am not causing sectarian evocations. Let no one say that Sayyed is doing so. Not at all! Where are your churches? Where are your patriarchs? Where are your nuns? Where are your crosses? Where are the statues of Mary (pbuh)? Where are your sanctities? Where are all of these? What has the world done for them? What did the world do for them previously in Iraq? Aren’t these groups causing all of this in all the regions?”

Nasrallah is confirming that Christians and Christian churches survive openly in Lebanon and in Syria under government controlled areas. Indeed, Syrian soldiers of all faiths, be they Muslim or Christian, are on the frontline against ISIS and various al-Qaeda affiliates. Whereas, in Iraq, the demise of the Christian population is based on the intrigues of major Western powers and the role of Sunni Islamists in major Gulf nations that are spreading Sunni Islamic sectarianism. Similarly, not one single Christian church is tolerated in Saudi Arabia. Also, in major Western nations, the problem is Sunni Islamist educational indoctrination that is being tolerated via Takfiri Sunni mosques and Sunni Islamist educational facilities that are creating states within a state.

In a past article by Modern Tokyo Times, it was stated, “It is ironic that Hezbollah (Hizbullah) in Lebanon under His Eminence, Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah, is more concerned about the plight of Christians and other religious minorities, rather than the so-called democratic West. Indeed, it is abundantly clear that America, France, and the United Kingdom are fully behind the emptying of Christians throughout the Middle East based on their close ties with feudal Gulf monarchies. Therefore, while Saudi Arabia bans the Christian faith it is also clear that Western meddling in Iraq, Libya, and Syria, is leading to a catastrophe for the Christian populations of these nations. Indeed, it is even hard to say nations about Iraq and Libya because Gulf and Western destabilization policies have led to failed states. Syria, thankfully, is fighting tenaciously in order to preserve the religious mosaic and to prevent another failed state.”

Mattis is clearly delusional at best but at worse his words are based on enormous manipulation of language. Yes, Iran and Hezbollah are anti-Israel but this is a different issue that is outside the scope of international terrorism. In other words, if America opposes Iran despite this nation helping America in the past in Afghanistan via the Northern Alliance after September 11 and the role of this nation in modern day Iraq, then Mattis should focus on the geopolitical reality of this and the role of Gulf petrodollars.

International terrorism is mainly killing in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. Sometimes, the same international terrorist butchers in Berlin, Brussels, London, Madrid, New York, Nice, Paris, and other Western cities. Yet this international terrorism is Sunni Islamist and just like the nation state of Saudi Arabia, this hatred is aimed at all non-Muslims, the Shia, and moderate variants of Sunni Islam that are now equally being deemed to be apostates. Therefore, Mattis is disingenuous and is misleading the people of America by focusing on limited and endless geopolitical games that are emboldening the sword of Sunni Islamism.

 

Trump’s “Bizarro” Speech To the Ruler of Wahhabia

Bizarro–“The opposite of the real world. Good is evil, round is square, hello is goodbye.”

Transcript of Trump’s speech in Saudi Arabia

“I want to thank King Salman for his extraordinary words, and the magnificent Kingdom of Saudi Arabia for hosting today’s summit. I am honored to be received by such gracious hosts. I have always heard about the splendor of your country and the kindness of your citizens, but words do not do justice to the grandeur of this remarkable place and the incredible hospitality you have shown us from the moment we arrived.
You also hosted me in the treasured home of King Abdulaziz, the founder of the Kingdom who united your great people. Working alongside another beloved leader — American President Franklin Roosevelt — King Abdulaziz began the enduring partnership between our two countries. King Salman: your father would be so proud to see that you are continuing his legacy — and just as he opened the first chapter in our partnership, today we begin a new chapter that will bring lasting benefits to our citizens.
Let me now also extend my deep and heartfelt gratitude to each and every one of the distinguished heads of state who made this journey here today. You greatly honor us with your presence, and I send the warmest regards from my country to yours. I know that our time together will bring many blessings to both your people and mine.
I stand before you as a representative of the American People, to deliver a message of friendship and hope. That is why I chose to make my first foreign visit a trip to the heart of the Muslim world, to the nation that serves as custodian of the two holiest sites in the Islamic Faith.
In my inaugural address to the American People, I pledged to strengthen America’s oldest friendships, and to build new partnerships in pursuit of peace. I also promised that America will not seek to impose our way of life on others, but to outstretch our hands in the spirit of cooperation and trust.
Our vision is one of peace, security, and prosperity—in this region, and in the world.
Our goal is a coalition of nations who share the aim of stamping out extremism and providing our children a hopeful future that does honor to God.
And so this historic and unprecedented gathering of leaders—unique in the history of nations—is a symbol to the world of our shared resolve and our mutual respect. To the leaders and citizens of every country assembled here today, I want you to know that the United States is eager to form closer bonds of friendship, security, culture and commerce.
For Americans, this is an exciting time. A new spirit of optimism is sweeping our country: in just a few months, we have created almost a million new jobs, added over 3 trillion dollars of new value, lifted the burdens on American industry, and made record investments in our military that will protect the safety of our people and enhance the security of our wonderful friends and allies — many of whom are here today.
Now, there is even more blessed news I am pleased to share with you. My meetings with King Salman, the Crown Prince, and the Deputy Crown Prince, have been filled with great warmth, good will, and tremendous cooperation. Yesterday, we signed historic agreements with the Kingdom that will invest almost $400 billion in our two countries and create many thousands of jobs in America and Saudi Arabia.
This landmark agreement includes the announcement of a $110 billion Saudi-funded defense purchase — and we will be sure to help our Saudi friends to get a good deal from our great American defense companies. This agreement will help the Saudi military to take a greater role in security operations.
We have also started discussions with many of the countries present today on strengthening partnerships, and forming new ones, to advance security and stability across the Middle East and beyond.
Later today, we will make history again with the opening of a new Global Center for Combating Extremist Ideology — located right here, in this central part of the Islamic World.
This groundbreaking new center represents a clear declaration that Muslim-majority countries must take the lead in combating radicalization, and I want to express our gratitude to King Salman for this strong demonstration of leadership.
I have had the pleasure of welcoming several of the leaders present today to the White House, and I look forward to working with all of you.
America is a sovereign nation and our first priority is always the safety and security of our citizens. We are not here to lecture—we are not here to tell other people how to live, what to do, who to be, or how to worship. Instead, we are here to offer partnership — based on shared interests and values — to pursue a better future for us all.
Here at this summit we will discuss many interests we share together. But above all we must be united in pursuing the one goal that transcends every other consideration. That goal is to meet history’s great test—to conquer extremism and vanquish the forces of terrorism.
Young Muslim boys and girls should be able to grow up free from fear, safe from violence, and innocent of hatred. And young Muslim men and women should have the chance to build a new era of prosperity for themselves and their peoples.
With God’s help, this summit will mark the beginning of the end for those who practice terror and spread its vile creed. At the same time, we pray this special gathering may someday be remembered as the beginning of peace in the Middle East — and maybe, even all over the world.
But this future can only be achieved through defeating terrorism and the ideology that drives it.
Few nations have been spared its violent reach.
America has suffered repeated barbaric attacks — from the atrocities of September 11th to the devastation of the Boston Bombing, to the horrible killings in San Bernardino and Orlando.
The nations of Europe have also endured unspeakable horror. So too have the nations of Africa and even South America. India, Russia, China and Australia have been victims.
But, in sheer numbers, the deadliest toll has been exacted on the innocent people of Arab, Muslim and Middle Eastern nations. They have borne the brunt of the killings and the worst of the destruction in this wave of fanatical violence.
Some estimates hold that more than 95 percent of the victims of terrorism are themselves Muslim.
We now face a humanitarian and security disaster in this region that is spreading across the planet. It is a tragedy of epic proportions. No description of the suffering and depravity can begin to capture its full measure.
The true toll of ISIS, al Qaeda, Hezbollah, Hamas, and so many others, must be counted not only in the number of dead. It must also be counted in generations of vanished dreams.
The Middle East is rich with natural beauty, vibrant cultures, and massive amounts of historic treasures. It should increasingly become one of the great global centers of commerce and opportunity.
This region should not be a place from which refugees flee, but to which newcomers flock.
Saudi Arabia is home to the holiest sites in one of the world’s great faiths. Each year millions of Muslims come from around the world to Saudi Arabia to take part in the Hajj. In addition to ancient wonders, this country is also home to modern ones—including soaring achievements in architecture.
Egypt was a thriving center of learning and achievement thousands of years before other parts of the world. The wonders of Giza, Luxor and Alexandria are proud monuments to that ancient heritage.
All over the world, people dream of walking through the ruins of Petra in Jordan. Iraq was the cradle of civilization and is a land of natural beauty. And the United Arab Emirates has reached incredible heights with glass and steel, and turned earth and water into spectacular works of art.
The entire region is at the center of the key shipping lanes of the Suez Canal, the Red Sea, and the Straits of Hormuz. The potential of this region has never been greater. 65 percent of its population is under the age of 30. Like all young men and women, they seek great futures to build, great national projects to join, and a place for their families to call home.
But this untapped potential, this tremendous cause for optimism, is held at bay by bloodshed and terror. There can be no coexistence with this violence. There can be no tolerating it, no accepting it, no excusing it, and no ignoring it.
Every time a terrorist murders an innocent person, and falsely invokes the name of God, it should be an insult to every person of faith.
Terrorists do not worship God, they worship death.
If we do not act against this organized terror, then we know what will happen. Terrorism’s devastation of life will continue to spread. Peaceful societies will become engulfed by violence. And the futures of many generations will be sadly squandered.
If we do not stand in uniform condemnation of this killing—then not only will we be judged by our people, not only will we be judged by history, but we will be judged by God.
This is not a battle between different faiths, different sects, or different civilizations.
This is a battle between barbaric criminals who seek to obliterate human life, and decent people of all religions who seek to protect it.
This is a battle between Good and Evil.
When we see the scenes of destruction in the wake of terror, we see no signs that those murdered were Jewish or Christian, Shia or Sunni. When we look upon the streams of innocent blood soaked into the ancient ground, we cannot see the faith or sect or tribe of the victims — we see only that they were Children of God whose deaths are an insult to all that is holy.
But we can only overcome this evil if the forces of good are united and strong — and if everyone in this room does their fair share and fulfills their part of the burden.
Terrorism has spread across the world. But the path to peace begins right here, on this ancient soil, in this sacred land.
America is prepared to stand with you — in pursuit of shared interests and common security.
But the nations of the Middle East cannot wait for American power to crush this enemy for them. The nations of the Middle East will have to decide what kind of future they want for themselves, for their countries, and for their children.
It is a choice between two futures — and it is a choice America CANNOT make for you.
A better future is only possible if your nations drive out the terrorists and extremists. Drive. Them. Out.
DRIVE THEM OUT of your places of worship.
DRIVE THEM OUT of your communities.
DRIVE THEM OUT of your holy land, and DRIVE THEM OUT OF THIS EARTH.
For our part, America is committed to adjusting our strategies to meet evolving threats and new facts. We will discard those strategies that have not worked—and will apply new approaches informed by experience and judgment. We are adopting a Principled Realism, rooted in common values and shared interests.
Our friends will never question our support, and our enemies will never doubt our determination.
Our partnerships will advance security through stability, not through radical disruption. We will make decisions based on real-world outcomes — not inflexible ideology. We will be guided by the lessons of experience, not the confines of rigid thinking. And, wherever possible, we will seek gradual reforms — not sudden intervention.
We must seek partners, not perfection—and to make allies of all who share our goals.
Above all, America seeks peace — not war.
Muslim nations must be willing to take on the burden, if we are going to defeat terrorism and send its wicked ideology into oblivion.
The first task in this joint effort is for your nations to deny all territory to the foot soldiers of evil.
Every country in the region has an absolute duty to ensure that terrorists find no sanctuary on their soil.
Many are already making significant contributions to regional security: Jordanian pilots are crucial partners against ISIS in Syria and Iraq. Saudi Arabia and a regional coalition have taken strong action against Houthi militants in Yemen. The Lebanese Army is hunting ISIS operatives who try to infiltrate their territory. Emirati troops are supporting our Afghan partners. In Mosul, American troops are supporting Kurds, Sunnis and Shias fighting together for their homeland. Qatar, which hosts the U.S. Central Command, is a crucial strategic partner. Our longstanding partnership with Kuwait and Bahrain continue to enhance security in the region. And courageous Afghan soldiers are making tremendous sacrifices in the fight against the Taliban, and others, in the fight for their country.
As we deny terrorist organizations control of territory and populations, we must also strip them of their access to funds. We must cut off the financial channels that let ISIS sell oil, let extremists pay their fighters, and help terrorists smuggle their reinforcements.
I am proud to announce that the nations here today will be signing an agreement to prevent the financing of terrorism, called the Terrorist Financing Targeting Center — co-chaired by the United States and Saudi Arabia, and joined by every member of the Gulf Cooperation Council. It is another historic step in a day that will be long remembered.
I also applaud the Gulf Cooperation Council for blocking funders from using their countries as a financial base for terror, and designating Hezbollah as a terrorist organization last year. Saudi Arabia also joined us this week in placing sanctions on one of the most senior leaders of Hezbollah.
Of course, there is still much work to do.
That means honestly confronting the crisis of Islamist extremism and the Islamist terror groups it inspires. And it means standing together against the murder of innocent Muslims, the oppression of women, the persecution of Jews, and the slaughter of Christians.
Religious leaders must make this absolutely clear: Barbarism will deliver you no glory — piety to evil will bring you no dignity. If you choose the path of terror, your life will be empty, your life will be brief, and YOUR SOUL WILL BE CONDEMNED.
And political leaders must speak out to affirm the same idea: heroes don’t kill innocents; they save them. Many nations here today have taken important steps to raise up that message. Saudi Arabia’s Vision for 2030 is an important and encouraging statement of tolerance, respect, empowering women, and economic development.
The United Arab Emirates has also engaged in the battle for hearts and souls—and with the U.S., launched a center to counter the online spread of hate. Bahrain too is working to undermine recruitment and radicalism.
I also applaud Jordan, Turkey and Lebanon for their role in hosting refugees. The surge of migrants and refugees leaving the Middle East depletes the human capital needed to build stable societies and economies. Instead of depriving this region of so much human potential, Middle Eastern countries can give young people hope for a brighter future in their home nations and regions.
That means promoting the aspirations and dreams of all citizens who seek a better life — including women, children, and followers of all faiths. Numerous Arab and Islamic scholars have eloquently argued that protecting equality strengthens Arab and Muslim communities.
For many centuries the Middle East has been home to Christians, Muslims and Jews living side-by-side. We must practice tolerance and respect for each other once again—and make this region a place where every man and woman, no matter their faith or ethnicity, can enjoy a life of dignity and hope.
In that spirit, after concluding my visit in Riyadh, I will travel to Jerusalem and Bethlehem, and then to the Vatican — visiting many of the holiest places in the three Abrahamic Faiths. If these three faiths can join together in cooperation, then peace in this world is possible — including peace between Israelis and Palestinians. I will be meeting with both Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.
Starving terrorists of their territory, their funding, and the false allure of their craven ideology, will be the basis for defeating them.
But no discussion of stamping out this threat would be complete without mentioning the government that gives terrorists all three—safe harbor, financial backing, and the social standing needed for recruitment. It is a regime that is responsible for so much instability in the region. I am speaking of course of Iran.
From Lebanon to Iraq to Yemen, Iran funds, arms, and trains terrorists, militias, and other extremist groups that spread destruction and chaos across the region. For decades, Iran has fueled the fires of sectarian conflict and terror.
It is a government that speaks openly of mass murder, vowing the destruction of Israel, death to America, and ruin for many leaders and nations in this room.
Among Iran’s most tragic and destabilizing interventions have been in Syria. Bolstered by Iran, Assad has committed unspeakable crimes, and the United States has taken firm action in response to the use of banned chemical weapons by the Assad Regime — launching 59 tomahawk missiles at the Syrian air base from where that murderous attack originated.
Responsible nations must work together to end the humanitarian crisis in Syria, eradicate ISIS, and restore stability to the region. The Iranian regime’s longest-suffering victims are its own people. Iran has a rich history and culture, but the people of Iran have endured hardship and despair under their leaders’ reckless pursuit of conflict and terror.
Until the Iranian regime is willing to be a partner for peace, all nations of conscience must work together to isolate Iran, deny it funding for terrorism, and pray for the day when the Iranian people have the just and righteous government they deserve.
The decisions we make will affect countless lives.
King Salman, I thank you for the creation of this great moment in history, and for your massive investment in America, its industry and its jobs. I also thank you for investing in the future of this part of the world.
This fertile region has all the ingredients for extraordinary success — a rich history and culture, a young and vibrant people, a thriving spirit of enterprise. But you can only unlock this future if the citizens of the Middle East are freed from extremism, terror and violence.
We in this room are the leaders of our peoples. They look to us for answers, and for action. And when we look back at their faces, behind every pair of eyes is a soul that yearns for justice.
Today, billions of faces are now looking at us, waiting for us to act on the great question of our time.
Will we be indifferent in the presence of evil? Will we protect our citizens from its violent ideology?
Will we let its venom spread through our societies? Will we let it destroy the most holy sites on earth? If we do not confront this deadly terror, we know what the future will bring—more suffering and despair. But if we act—if we leave this magnificent room unified and determined to do what it takes to destroy the terror that threatens the world—then there is no limit to the great future our citizens will have.
The birthplace of civilization is waiting to begin a new renaissance. Just imagine what tomorrow could bring.
Glorious wonders of science, art, medicine and commerce to inspire humankind. Great cities built on the ruins of shattered towns. New jobs and industries that will lift up millions of people. Parents who no longer worry for their children, families who no longer mourn for their loved ones, and the faithful who finally worship without fear.
These are the blessings of prosperity and peace. These are the desires that burn with a righteous flame in every human heart. And these are the just demands of our beloved peoples.
I ask you to join me, to join together, to work together, and to FIGHT together— BECAUSE UNITED, WE WILL NOT FAIL.
Thank you. God Bless You. God Bless Your Countries. And God Bless the United States of America.”
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